The Filipino Garage - KuyaChris & Friends - A Filipino American Perspective https://kuyachris.com Through conversations with artists and community members, we’re spreading positivity, thoughts, music, and art—all through a Filipino American perspective. Based out of Daly City—the Pinoy Capital of the United States—the goal is to empower the FilAm community and Pinays / Pinoys throughout the world by profiling awesome people and spreading good vibes. This is a mix of personal journals, interviews, recordings, and whatever can be created. Hope you enjoy! Tue, 20 Oct 2020 22:08:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 Through conversations with artists and community members, we're spreading positivity, thoughts, music, and art—all through a Filipino American perspective. Based out of Daly City—the Pinoy Capital of the United States—the goal is to empower the FilAm community and Pinays / Pinoys throughout the world by profiling awesome people and spreading good vibes. This is a mix of personal journals, interviews, recordings, and whatever can be created. Hope you enjoy! KuyaChris yes episodic KuyaChris christian.j.guerrero@gmail.com christian.j.guerrero@gmail.com (KuyaChris) Thoughts & Reflections // Positivity & Friends The Filipino Garage - KuyaChris & Friends - A Filipino American Perspective http://kuyachris.com/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/the_filipino_garage_podcast_logo.jpg https://kuyachris.com Kuya Book 01 – Coming Full Circle by Leny Strobel / Overview & Thoughts https://kuyachris.com/kuya-book-01-coming-full-circle-by-leny-strobel-overview-thoughts/ Mon, 25 May 2020 20:01:38 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=6566 New project! This is the first experiment of exploring books on the podcast. I'll be giving an overview Leny Strobel's Coming Full Circle: The Process of Decolonization Among Post-1965 Filipino Americans. This is a pivotal book in FilAm literature and it has a lot of wisdom and lessons within it. It's an informal overview, with specific quotes thrown in to highlight the main takeaways. Coming Full Circle is a project of decolonization based off interviews with post-1965 Filipino Americans . Through a process that Strobel calls "fishing for knowledge" through books and interviews, she organizes themes of decolonization under the categories of Naming, Reflection, and Action. This framework is greatly influenced by Paulo Friere and his idea that oppressed peoples need to name the source of their oppression before they can enact change upon it. 11 generative themes of decolonization are presented, alongside a literature review of relevant material and research.

New project! This is the first experiment of exploring books on the podcast. I’ll be giving an overview Leny Strobel’s Coming Full Circle: The Process of Decolonization Among Post-1965 Filipino Americans. This is a pivotal book in FilAm literature and it has a lot of wisdom and lessons within it. It’s an informal overview, with specific quotes thrown in to highlight the main takeaways.

Coming Full Circle is a project of decolonization based off interviews with post-1965 Filipino Americans . Through a process that Strobel calls “fishing for knowledge” through books and interviews, she organizes themes of decolonization under the categories of Naming, Reflection, and Action. This framework is greatly influenced by Paulo Friere and his idea that oppressed peoples need to name the source of their oppression before they can enact change upon it. 11 generative themes of decolonization are presented, alongside a literature review of relevant material and research.

Support and buy a copy of the book.

Listed below are direct quotes from the book. Please support by buying a copy!

Chapter 1

Fishing: A Filipino Woman’s Way of Constructing Knowledge

  • “When I arrived in the U.S. in 1983 I didn’t know that it would be the end of the “little brown sister” era of my life. Like many Filipinos who have imbibed Hollywood images of the “good life,” I had dreamt of coming to live in the white man’s land. My assumptions about America were shaped by a colonial education that glorified everything white and American. I mastered English, the medium of this education, while the two Filipino languages I spoke, Tagalog and Pampango, and their accents were quickly traded in, hoping that I may win the master’s approval.”

“What is the relationship between imperialism and missionary work? Didn’t missionaries bring their own western cultural baggage to the people they “ministered” to?

“Freire (1970) wrote that by preaching sin and hell, churches appeal to the fatalistic and frightened consciousness of the oppressed. The promise of heaven becomes a relief for their existential fatigue. ”

“The conspiracy of silence amongst the oppressed, for fear of being blamed if we ever admitted failure or discrimination in America – the land of opportunity, continues to be perpetuated to this day as many immigrant Filipinos in the U.S. continue to regale their loved ones in the Philippines with stories of success and affluence while keeping quiet about their lack of sense of belonging and marginalization in this country.”

“individual self-actualization is not enough if it does not translate into action. Facing the fear and shame of oppression requires that we build communities of resistance” (referencing Thich Nhat Hanh in bell hooks, 1993)

“I must look deep within the collective memory of our cultural strength and indigenous imagination for the answers.”

“The healing of the self means the healing of the family”

“Kabilang na rito ang ibang Pilipino na hindi pa nakakaahon sa kanilang isipang kolonyal, na patuloy pa ring naniniwala na ang kanilang kultura ay hamak at walang pag-asang umunlad at magbago”

“Sometimes, it is other Filipinos who challenge this identity, especially those who have not yet escaped their colonized consciousness, and therefore continue to believe that Filipinos come from an impoverished culture, without hope or progress or change”

“May the sun split my body into halves and may my womenfolk heap their hatred on me should I ever be a friend of the Castillian!” – said the tribal king of Macabebe to Legazpi, the Spanish governor, hundreds of years ago”

“For a long time, I suffered from cultural amnesia. I was unconscious about my cultural identity. I thought I belonged to a tribe called “little brown sisters” ruled by the “big white masters.” The masters gave me their tongue, their ideas, their music, art forms, and their religion. They said the world I come from was dark, full of evil spirits, and they had brought the light with them to chase the ghosts away. With this light, they also chased away my memories. They said they had a divine right to conquer us and make us more human by cleaning up our slate and write new thoughts on it. And so without memories, I forgot who I was. I became a good colonial child. I became well-mannered, genteel, and civilized”

“ I sang about snow and cornfields and chestnuts roasting on the open fire without ever having seen snow, cornfields, or chestnuts.”

“To return home is to return to the ancient, to our anitos and our ancestors, to folklore and oral traditions which contain the indigeneous wisdom of my people”

“They say we are a people who lived in a convent for 300 years and 50 years in Hollywood. Perhaps on the outside, it seems so. But underneath this veneer, the ancient spirits never died, the anitos never slept. We are a people that has managed to survive the harsh consequences of our enslavement. Perhaps we owe it to the strength of our indigenous imagination, which even in its repression manages to show its colorful side from time to time.”

“How can the colonizer give that which he doesn’t have? He is not free. He is not whole. For if he was, then he would not have needed to destroy others who were not like him”

“This is what decolonization taught me: the present is all I have. Yes, I understand the past, I have grieved over it, forgave it, and this moment, the present – is a gift from the past. It is perfect just as it is. There is nothing I could do about yesterday and nothing I can do about tomorrow. Today is all I have.”

“Yet no sooner have I declared this love for my Filipino self that I am once again criticized for being nostalgic or romantic about a past that can never be returned to/recovered/reclaimed. I am accused of essentializing my ethnic identity and I am told that in the postmodern global era, the definition of culture and ethnic identity are empty spaces incapable of holding up to any notion of authenticity. I am told that when I talk about the healing of traumatic memory, of reclaiming the Filipino cultural self that was repressed and denied, that I am appealing to some framework that pathologizes the very identity that I want to liberate”

Chapter 2

A historical overview and study.

“Through the critical analysis of historical events, in this case, the colonization of the Philippines, and the interconnectedness of these events to the lived experience and their personal and social consequences to Filipino Americans, a framework emerges that could serve as a model for de-centering colonial mentality.”

“Community empowerment and political empowerment are critically linked in strengthening Filipino American identity. Decolonization, as consciousness-raising, facilitates empowerment at the personal level”

“Filipino Americans must be able to identify their source of agency, which lies in their recovery of indigenous knowledge and finding therein symbolic meaning that will be useful for decolonization. These Filipino indigenous knowledge and cultural values, which were repressed and submerged under colonization, need to be reclaimed, re-imagined, or re-created in order to recover a strong sense of Filipino identity.” (to emerge from the culture of silence)

“This study, ultimately, is about reconciliation and healing. It is about coming full circle, and finding a home and a voice of one’s own”

“The classical assimilation model of immigration history is no longer sufficient to understand Filipino immigration”

“the educational system, together with American popular culture, was instrumental in forming a generation of middle-class, urban, and educated Filipinos whose values were very much influenced by the colonial educational system and American popular culture”

“The mostly single Filipino male population was subjected to discrimination and were labeled as “immoral and a threat to society” because they were dating and marrying white women. This false and generalized representation of the Filipino male as “immoral and a threat to society,”

“After the Philippine American War, many of the American soldiers who used to sing “educate them with a Krag” (the standard army rifle of that day) assumed the role of teachers. William Howard Taft believed that the best way to “pacify” the Filipino was to “ educate” him”

“The Americanization of educational institutions in the Philippines produced the local elite and alienated the masses”

“Nemesio Prudente, calls the educational system “irrelevant because of its colonial nature which serves neocolonial interest and does not coordinate with the economy and manpower requirements of the Philippines”

“The educational institutions during this period became an instrument of instilling the idea that American ideas, culture, and educational system were superior to the cultural and educational legacies of Spanish colonization and the indigenous Filipino culture”

“One could also read Woodson’s Miseducation of the Negro (1933) and draw parallels between the Filipino experience and African American educational experience at an earlier period.”

“When oppressed people learn to unravel and discover the ‘whys’ in the fabric in which their objectification and dehumanization were given, they will also find their liberation.”

“dominant knowledge is constructed and reproduced by the dominant system in order to perpetuate their power positions to the exclusions of its “others”

Pagtatanung-tanong

  • “has the following basic characteristics: a) the structure is not pre-determined, b) the researcher and participants have a mutual and equal relationship, and c) the beginning, middle, and end of the process is flexible (Pe-Pua, 1990)”

“Establishing respectful and equal interpersonal relationship is necessary to build trust which in turn ensures the accuracy and reliability of the data”

“knowledge is created by talking and doing things together so that both the participants and researcher get connected in ways that creates critical knowledge”

“Decolonization as Re-rooting: Challenging the Soil You Want to Sink Roots In” paper by Leny Strobel

“all the “voices” that are emerging from the culture of silence need to be heard”

“The study of the process of decolonization must include all of the dimensions of one’s experience: memories, feelings, attitudes, values, knowledge, doubts, and fears.”

Chapter 3

Fishing for Knowledge

A literature review in four parts.

Four Main Categories of Sources

  1. the ideological assumptions of US imperialism and expansion in Asia
  2. important contemporary works by post-colonial critics outside of the Philippines
  3. Filipino perspective on decolonization
  4. interdisciplinary works in the field of orality/literacy studies

“In the racialized imagination of European colonialists, the “other” was primitive, barbaric, and uncivilized and therefore deserved to be ruled. As will be clear later, the U.S. expansion in Asia is very much undergirded by this ideology.”

“Mark Twain saw the betrayal of the Philippines by the U.S. government as a betrayal of American institutions: the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. In calling for an end to the Philippine American war, and calling it a war of “criminal aggression,” he also saw it as a reflection of a “household on fire.” The values of liberty and freedom contained in the Declaration and the Constitution were betrayed in the U.S. policy on the Philippines.”

“Post-colonial literature seeks to separate itself from the “privileged” norm of English literature, which represents the imperial center, by questioning the ideological assumptions of this hegemonic literature.”

“They discovered that marginality could be a great source of creative energy.”

“A classic example of this ethnography is the St. Louis World Exposition in 1906, where a whole tribe of indigenous Filipinos, the Igorots, were put on display in stages of evolution: from primitive, dog-eating, g-string clad bodies, to western-dressed, poised, brown bodies, symbolizing the triumph of the U.S.’ “civilizing mission.”

“Ethnographers realized that their classic narrations failed to take into account the influence of their positionality on the interpretations of their subjects and have likewise erased the possibility of their subjects to speak for themselves”

“By understanding how colonization, after centuries of accommodating the colonizer’s culture, has made the native internalize his own oppression, the colonized must now learn how to separate himself from the master.” (summarizing Fanon 1963)

Friere

  • “Freire’s pedagogy emphasizes that only the oppressed can liberate themselves when they learn to “name” the objective reality of their oppression.”
  • “By naming the social and political structures and the people that maintain these structures, the oppressed would be able to identify how they have internalized their own oppression.”
  • “Freire’s view of religion as an instrument of creating false consciousness is important and instructive, particularly in understanding colonial situations where religion was a main instrument of colonization, as in the case of the Philippines ”
  • “Religion, as an instrument of colonialism, gives the oppressed a false sense of superiority over their masters which in turn leads them to focus on a “life beyond” and consequently, fail to address the unjust social structures that oppress them by seeing them as mundane.”
  • “Having been conditioned to become dependent on the false generosity of the oppressor, the oppressed become fearful of becoming responsible for themselves.”

Jung

  • “Jung was influenced by the Romantic period which reacted against the rationalism of the Enlightenment.”
  • “Neglected psychic needs look for external compensation. Jungian psychology finds that there is a correlation between psychological insecurity, anxiety, and fear with the demand for security, order, and force.”
  • “A colonized person who is unaware of these projections and who responds by the accommodation of these projections is what Freire, Fanon, Memmi, and Nandy refer to as internalization of oppression or identification with the colonizer or playing host to the oppressor. These shadowy projections need to be rejected by the colonized; the latter cannot expect the colonizer to withdraw these projections willingly because the colonizer will not willingly relinquish his power and privilege”
  • “failure to do so results in the identification with the colonizer so that the colonized begins to act like a colonizer and projects to others of his own kind but maybe of a lower social or economic class, the same projections he has internalized, perpetuating the colonization process”

“The project of decolonization for the colonized individual is a process of learning to love one’s self again, of seeing one’s self as important enough to think and write about, of learning to face the truth and learning to tell the truth”

“Learn to face and tell the truth. Learn critical affirmation. Have a vocation, a sense of calling . Lessen stress. Be healthy. Overcome addictions and co-dependency. Learn creative dreaming and thinking; create new images and self representations. Deal with grief. Develop a passionate life. Love your body. Learn to love. Live in community. Let go of bitterness. Love the Earth, love your ancestors. Practice spirituality.” (Sisters of the Yam, 1993 hooks, thirteen steps that must be integrated towards a wholistic self-recovery)

“The healing process is simultaneously an individual and communal effort. What is summoned from the depths of one’s soul comes from the wounded collective memory of colonized peoples, but so does the healing power that comes from woundedness”

“In the U.S., ethnic groups and their “exotic” cultural practices (dances, food, festivals, rituals) are appropriated or consumed like “spice” to the blandness of white America”

“Even as ethnic groups “display” their cultural practices for cultural tourists, the same practices are also a medium for remembering their ethnic memories. Ethnic memory sustains ethnic identity” (hooks, 1992)

“The national memory of America often marginalizes racial and ethnic groups but the ethnic memory serves as a powerful counternarrative. Ethnic memory is not about nostalgia. It is not about mythologizing a destroyed past or the return to a pristine, pre-colonial culture. Ethnic memory is about the construction of new identities out of the painful experiences of the past.”

“As counter-narrative, ethnic memory always tries to maintain at the center of national memory what the dominant group would like to forget”

“Renato Constantino is a Philippine historian and social critic. In 1966, he wrote The Miseducation of the Filipino which has become a landmark essay for decolonization. In this essay”

“The public school system with English as medium of instruction, together with the “glorification of the American way of life, its heroes and institutions” produced an Americanized Filipino consciousness.”

“Filipino consciousness under the Americans was a further deepening of the colonial consciousness that the Spaniards had implanted”

“Other Filipino historians like Teodoro Agoncillo have assumed that it was impossible to write the real history of the Filipino people under Spain because the colonizer wrote and produced all materials”

“In “Boat Building and Seamanship,” Scott documents Filipino expertise in boatbuilding, their nautical skills, and the importance of seafaring life in the Philippines and reveals the intricate structure and complex trading practices among Filipinos prior to Spanish conquest”

“De Los Reyes was a writer, publisher, printer, businessman, and the “common ingredient” of all his activities, from “folklore to politics, was a sheer rejoicing in things Filipino.”

“ It never occurred to de los Reyes that the Filipino was racially inferior to anyone. His activities led him to prison and then to exile in Madrid. When he returned, the Americans had taken over and before long he was campaigning for a jury system, universal suffrage, and labor laws to liberate workers from economic dependence and docility. He resumed writing against anti-American imperialism, became a senator, and to the end of his life, remained a minority voice among a people who have “learned to dance to a new tune with lyrics imported from abroad” (a lengthy essay written by Scott, talking about Isabelo de los Reyes)

sikolohiyang mapagpalaya

“Pagkataong Pilipino , therefore, refers to the psychology of kapwa or shared identity of Filipinos.”

“The core concepts of kapwa (shared identity), loob (shared humanity), damdam (capacity to feel for another), paninindigan (strength of conviction) are more descriptive of Filipino values than those previously asserted by an earlier Western-trained group of Filipino social scientists who claimed that hiya (sense of shame), utang na loob (gratitude/reciprocity), amor propio (self-esteem), and pakikisama (smooth interpersonal relations) are Filipino values.”

“diwa (psyche) of Filipinos, one must look at the indigenous cultures and what survives of their songs, chants, epics, dances, rituals and other folk traditions”

“To discover the true Filipino, one must go to the local culture, instead of looking at Manila or Makati for a definition of what is Filipino”

“Indigenization is the attempt to reclaim Filipino cultural values by centering the Filipino self as a reference to the “other” without creating rigid boundaries between that self and other”

“Alejo claims that the “weakness” of Filipino culture lies in the refusal to struggle with the language because under colonization, the language was devalued, repressed, and negated.” (Alejo 1990)

“the effects of colonization and how, with only borrowed consciousness, Filipinos have been lost without access to their own language, to their own philosophy.” (Alejo)

“Filipino Catholicism is still one that appeals to the gods for inner strength (lakas ng loob) rather than one that asks for salvation or release from guilt” (Maggay)

“the instrument of colonial control, the pasyon , was used creatively and indigenously to create a language of dissent for the peasant revolutionaries.”

“English language has been the medium of empire building and literature its handmaiden”

“If we can give the Filipino husbandman a knowledge of the English language and only the most elemental acquiantance of English writings, we will free him from that degraded dependence upon the man of influence of his own race” (from the US Philippine Commission in 1905)

“How can Filipinos, who have been educated in a foreign language, express indigenous thoughts without equivalence in the foreign culture? While their thinking structure and mental processes remained indigenous, they were made to express their ideas in a foreign tongue. The imposition of a foreign language implied the inferiority of the native language(s) of Filipinos and reduced Filipinos to imitation, parody and subservience.”

“America Is in the Heart (1946), written by Carlos Bulosan, remains in the canon, not only of Asian American literature, but of post-colonial literature and multicultural literature”

“The book chronicles the life of Filipino laborers, their life of despair and depravity as they are relegated to the margins and made to live the life of the drunk, the criminal, the hustler, the thief”

“These college students are instrumental in bringing this knowledge home, so to speak and this is creating a ripple effect in the community in the Bay Area”

“Cultural Studies claim that it is not enough to recognize and respect difference; it must show how culture is a site of ideological struggle.”

“arrogant perception” — a compensatory way of trying to feel good about one’s self by looking down on other people” (Lugones)

“Imperialism and colonialism, as ideologies, accompanied by a transcendent belief in “manifest destiny,” were powerful partners in the domination of Filipinos. ”

“The re-telling is, therefore, a process of imagining and creating a new story, a useful fiction, so to speak, in order for the story to become a source of empowerment through a new way of looking at history. Re-telling, therefore, sets free the over-determined aspects of Filipino colonial history .”

“If language is the site of ideological struggle, it can also be a site of negotiation. Language can become an oppositional force and an affirmative force; it can create new ways of reading history through the reconstruction of suppressed memories. Therefore, language can also create new identities capable of challenging the conditions that negate the voices, desires, and histories of silenced peoples.”

“ The narratives that came out of Europe were universalized and rendered transcendent and, therefore, became narratives that sustained European colonialism and imperialism around the world”

“The belief that “other” cultures are primitive and barbaric because they were not “like Europe” is an example of a narrative that puts the European “I” at the center of power and all others on the margins.”

“Postmodernism, on the other hand, asserts that the discourse from the margins (which includes women) should be made central and visible in order to make difference and diversity as the norm.”

“Postcolonial critics also mention that postmodernism fails to address the need of oppressed cultures to construct narratives or redemption and emancipation.”

“As a border intellectual himself, Freire emphasizes literacy as the act of knowing; knowing leads to the ability of the oppressed to “decode” the oppressive structures of their world; and is followed by action that demands a social transformation.”

The Re-emergence of Orality

“Orality studies provide another context for articulating and legitimizing Filipino narratives on decolonization”

“Orality studies provide another context for articulating and legitimizing Filipino narratives on decolonization”

“Although there hardly exist any purely oral cultures today, there are many residually oral cultures, cultures which have made the transition to literacy but have retained the mindset of primary orality”

“Modern consciousness, shaped by the dominance of the written word, made possible the opening up of the psyche giving way to articulate introspection and precise verbalization by freeing the word from its context” (Ong 1982)

“the audience participates in a form of communal introspection making knowledge a shared property”

“oral cultures use formulaic expressions: sayings, proverbs, and clichés as repository of wisdom.” (Tannen 1982)

“information is often not stated explicitly because truth is assumed to lie in experience, which in turn is verified by the experiences of its listeners”

“different from literate cultures where the written text is authoritative source of meaning and may not always have the benefit of the immediacy of the context”

“The memories may belong to every person in the community but the content and the language is communally shared; these become expressions of a group’s tradition and identity. Memory is built up by repetition, recall and recollection.”

“Oral cultures encourage fluency, fulsomeness of speech;”

“To take as your yardstick the present circumstances in western Europe and to assume that this is the standard that all literatures should be judged is to show a lack of historical and comparative perspective” (Finnegan 1988)

“oral literary forms also express insight, understanding, and truth. Society has learned to equate literature with intellectual thought and therefore orality (equated with “primitiveness”) was judged as incapable of intellectual thought. This is one of the mistaken assumptions about orality” (Finnegan 1988)

“Orality and literacy, therefore, are not two independent things, they take different forms at different times and contexts, and they mutually interact and affect each other.”

“In order to approximate the oral mode of thought and feeling, English in the Philippines has been nativized to express the Filipino heart, mind and soul”

“Filipino writers and scholars should be going to the hills to dig up the folklore and traditions that could give flesh to our national consciousness” (Azurin 1993)

“Although there are still those who would push for English as a force for national unity, the writers resisting this trend realize that English only serves as an umbilical cord to the colonizer”

“the post-1965 “brain drain” very quickly shifted to English and thus Filipino language was not maintained amongst the children of this group”

“Colonial education and its literate intentions destroys memory, a people’s epics, chanted choruses and other ritualized performances and their meanings are forgotten”

“Literacy, controlled by imperial power, and its value judgment about what is “primitive” and “civilized” replaced the oral world, (the cyclic, ordered, paradigmatic), with the written word”

“Paradoxically, in decolonization, the appropriation of written discourse, becomes a necessary tool for deconstructing the narratives of colonialism and for recovering orality.”

Chapter 4

Cooking and Eating the Fish: Generative Themes and Analysis

An analysis of the narratives and interviews.


“The narratives show that decolonization is: a) a search for cognitive knowledge about Filipino and Filipino American history and culture; b) a positive confrontation with the emotional aspects of this process; and, c) a search for a new way of constructing knowledge in a language that weaves together the various aspects of decolonization”

decolonization is a project of “digging up memories from one’s personal history and mining these memories as a new source of meaning”

Eleven Generative Themes

  • The Affective Content of Decolonization
  • The Power of Naming and Telling
  • The Role of Language
  • The Need for Filipino Cultural and Historical Knowledge
  • The Role of Memory
  • Imagining the Filipino American Community: New Expectations and Visions
  • The Process of Building Community Institutions
  • The Generational Responsibilities
  • Educational Expectations
  • The Gender Issue
  • The Role of Filipino Spirituality”

The Affective Content of Decolonization

“Decolonization allowed participants to name and acknowledge their feelings of denial, shame, insecurity, loneliness, and inferiority about being Filipino”

“Then there was me, the “non-FOB,” who spoke perfect English, born and raised here, had only white friends …I was “white” in every way except for the color of my skin, my nose and eyes” … “I chose the easy way of living, never challenging the preconceptions set up by Western culture” (Marissa)

“you should have some peace in your heart to nurture the culture that you know would be good for the community” (Luz)

The Power of Naming and Telling

“Freire says that liberation begins with the naming of the world. The oppressed need to be able to name the social and political structures that dominate them and keep them silenced; they need to become aware of how the dominating structures create the marginal and inferior “other.”

“I think we need to decolonize because we often think of ourselves as inferior to white people. For so long, we have failed to recognize our own culture” (Peter)

“Naming is a process of becoming visible to one’s self and being able to locate one’s self within a historical context.”

“Decolonization is the ability to narrate one’s story in a manner that makes sense and makes meaning out of all the experiences of the past”

“The story of the self contains the narrative of the nation. To tell one’s story is to allow the fragments of consciousness to be sutured, allowing the narrative to flow again.”

The Role of Language

“I resented Philippine-born who tried to speak in accent-less English, yet I resented the very same people who spoke to me in Tagalog, thinking it was obnoxious for them to assume that I knew the language” (Marissa)

“Laurie says that her father “never wanted me near the language; he said that if I learned to speak Tagalog, my English will be hindered and I will not succeed in my education”

“I believe that language is a carrier of the culture because it is a way of thinking; [if you understand the language] then you begin to understand why they think what they think; but you need to understand the idioms, the connotations of the language.” (Michelle)

“The Filipino indirect communication pattern has been identified as pahiwatig: evocative ways of expressing the need or want of something. Pahiwatig is understood as being grounded on the value of pakikiramdam: keen sensitivity to a complex of verbal and non-verbal cues interacting within a given communication context, and pakikipagkapwa-tao : to feel one with the other” (Maggay 1995)

“As Michelle states, “to know the language is to understand how and why a people think the way they do.”

“A newly arrived immigrant who speaks a variety of Filipino English can be discriminated against by other Filipinos who speak fluent “standard” English because the former’s language is often associated with inferiority, lack of intelligence, and “other-ness.”

“The language of decolonization, as a language of resistance against the grand narratives that have been hegemonic, is difficult to articulate in the early stages of decolonization because there is a built-in resistance to change”

“one must question how accessible these are to Filipino Americans outside of academe. Freire’s emphasis on theory and praxis presents a challenge”

The Need for Filipino Cultural and Historical Knowledge

“The invisibility of Philippine history in the participants’ education in the U.S. has consequences for one’s self-perception, just as critically as the loss of the Filipino language”

“I was so busy reading about a culture that existed outside my home that I was not aware of the beauty that existed in our home” (Teresa)

“The awareness of the constructed nature of knowledge demystifies the colonial and dominant narratives that are written in “authoritative” historical texts. When the colonized realize that they too can construct knowledge, it is a liberating idea”

“Sources of knowledge and wisdom such as folk sayings, proverbs, stories, myths and folklore, songs, dances, and humor, have not been considered as legitimate sources of knowledge in the colonial culture”

“The participants agreed that most of the selected programs are not educational; they merely reinforce nostalgia, and perpetuate colonial mentality.” (about TFC)

“On Filipino television and movies, you see light-skinned people represent the Filipino. If the actors and actresses have dark complexions, they are the comedians or they play the role of the ugly monsters” (Cheryl)

“Decolonization makes it possible to create counter-narratives that displaces the dominating narratives which perpetuate internal oppression and silence”

“As a social event, eating together fosters a deep connection with Filipino culture, much the same way that language does”

The Role of Memory

“Myths, folktales, proverbs, folkbeliefs, songs, poems, epics, rituals, humor—are teaching tools, in an oral culture, for how to live with Nature, with other people, and with the spirit world. Filipinos are residually oral (Alaras, 1993; Strobel, 1994), even with the perceived high rates of literacy because of the American patterned-educational system”

“The process of reclaiming Filipino history as a counter narrative to the history written by outsiders, becomes a process of reclaiming one’s memory: memories that were submerged because they were considered unimportant, inconsequential, and memories that were negated because of the internalized self-hatred of the colonial psyche”

“To reclaim memory at the personal level, is to engage in the process of creating a collective memory with a people’s history”

“The past is, in a sense, gone forever, there is no pure, pre-colonial Filipino culture to return to. However, in memory and remembering, a Filipino American can reclaim and appropriate anew the indigenous traditions in a symbolic way”

“When we speak our memories and document them, we are engaged in an act of construction of our present worlds. Our individual and collective memories help construct the reality of the present” (McLaughlin,D. & Tierney,W., 1993, p.2).”

Imagining the Filipino American Community: New Expectations and Visions

“Decolonization is really just the starting point for community building.”

“Unity” is a kind of narrative that obscures the heterogeneous reality of any group”

“What is being asked of you is not to lose sight of the parent culture. You have your own struggles within the U.S. context of racial politics, but you must also help in the political and cultural education of Filipino immigrants” (Luz)

“the purpose of decolonization is not to save others, but to understand and have a critical consciousness”

“Cultural and community work can mean a certain level of isolation. The participants will need to know that they are not alone; they need to develop support networks and a deep level of trust for their internal processes and in other Filipino Americans who are on the same journey with them.”

“Think about do-able pieces rather than the whole because if you try to tackle the big issues it will be difficult to act.” (Luz)

The Process of Building Community Institutions

“Related to the creation of new expectations and visions is the process of building community institutions”

“Critical consciousness must implicate the centers of power, making that power visible and subject to contestation”

The Generational Responsibilities

“To see their parents within a historical framework shifts from the sense of blame (Why didn’t you maintain the language? Why didn’t I know about this (historical events)? Why didn’t you teach me?), to understanding (Now I understand why my parents are the way they are; why they think and believe the way they think). Family relationships are healed and deepened, dialogue happens.”

“They didn’t always think it was important to get their citizenship but with all the laws that were being proposed against immigrants, they realized it was important to attain their citizenship.” (Cheryl)

“Decolonization for Filipino American college students also means to recognize the construction of their parents’ experience in America, as well as their own” (Luz)

Educational Excpectations

“Filipino American students need teachers who will understand their experience, who will make needed resources from non-traditional sources available”

“Lived experiences must be considered as valid sources of knowledge that must be conceptualized and theorized about, made visible in texts, in recognition of the fact that they live in a culture that still considers the printed word as highly authoritative”

The Gender Issue

“When the father is present in the narrative, his influence does not seem as positive as the mother’s and the participants talked mostly about their mother’s influence in their lives. Is this because the home is traditionally the mother’s domain”

The Role of Filipino Spirituality

“Filipino Catholicism is an appeal to the gods for inner strength (lakas ng loob) rather than an appeal for salvation or release from guilt”

“How then can we reconcile the acceptance, devotion of [our] parents to the Catholic religion, in particular, the worship of saints with Caucasian features?”

“the coercive tactics of colonization pressured Filipinos to accommodate the forms of Catholicism. But it did not transform the indigenous consciousness. Filipino indigenous consciousness is more animistic and polytheistic and at home in the spirit world and its multiple god”

Summary

“Naming is a powerful act because it creates awareness and a language for expressing the deeply felt intuitions that were always lurking just below the surface of the psyche”

“Filipino language maintenance provides the needed cultural continuity between generations and with the homeland”

“to understand the language is to understand why Filipinos think the way they think; the language expresses the culture.”

“The acquisition of Filipino cultural and historical knowledge is very important in decolonization”

“The Filipino story has always been told and written by outsiders who imposed their frames of references on Filipinos. To counter these narrations, decolonization recovers the history of a people through the recovery of cultural memory. To decolonize is to put together the dis-membered past in order to make sense of the trauma of the present” (Bhaba 1990)

“To know that Filipinos have a tradition of resistance, heroes, martyrs, heroines, a well-developed oral literature, and a spiritual connection to the Creator, to Nature, and to all created beings, is to know that those narratives of being “other,” i.e. primitive, inferior, uncivilized, not-as-good-as, and other narratives from the outside were lies told to silence and dominate.”

“Unity is often a euphemism for control, a means to confine and contain the elements of a society that do not fit into the definition of “American”

“Decolonization, as healing and as transformation of consciousness, results in changed relationships”

Chapter 5

Where Do We Go From Here?

“Decolonization means to reconnect with the past in order to understand the present and to be able to envision the future. These three—past, present, and future, on another level of consciousness co-exist simultaneously. The past is in the present, and the future is already being born in the present. Decolonization is a process that makes the mythical and historical past available to the present”

“The decolonized consciousness feels deeply the spiritual connection to one’s kapwa (fellow beings), making it possible to identify with one’s people and history in spite of personal, generational, educational, economic, class, and other forms of differences.”

“To understand that culture is a site of ideological struggle is to develop the ability to become a bordercrosser, in order to build coalitions with other oppressed groups, and use one’s position as a starting point for dialogue with people similarly located.”

“Naming the world, as participants said, changes a lot of things; it changes one’s perception of reality”

“As the participants learn to fill the gaps in their knowledge about Filipino and Filipino American history and culture, they are also able to imagine a future, healing the cultural amnesia and sense of shame about being Filipino and Filipino American.”

“The decolonization process must relate to the understanding of the Filipino diaspora in all parts of the world, and to the multicultural context of the U.S”

Naming-Reflection-Action Framework

“The framework below summarizes these patterns and commonalities through the framework of Naming, Reflection, and Action”

Naming

  • To decolonize is to be able to name internalized oppression, shame, inferiority, confusion, anger.
  • To decolonize is to acquire cognitive knowledge about Filipino culture and history.
  • To decolonize is to understand the meaning of “loss of cultural memory” and its consequences.
  • To decolonize is to understand how the loss of language affects Filipino identity.
  • To decolonize is to heal the self, heal the culture.
  • To decolonize is to name the oppressor and the oppressive social structures.
  • To decolonize is to recognize the orality of Filipino culture.”

Reflection

  • To decolonize is to develop the ability to question one’s reality as constructed by colonial narratives.
  • To decolonize is to develop critical consciousness that can understand the consequences of silence and invisibility,
  • To decolonize is to understand the need to recover memory.
  • To decolonize is to understand the generational gap as being constituted by historical realities that shape each generations’ experiences.
  • To decolonize is to understand ideological struggles within a multicultural context and the relationships of power within these struggles.
  • To decolonize is to understand the need for connection with the parent culture.
  • To decolonize is to ask: where do I go from here?”

Action

  • To decolonize is to decide to give back to the Filipino American community.
  • To decolonize is to learn to question.
  • To decolonize is to support and become involved in developing community institutions.
  • To decolonize is to take leadership positions in moving the Filipino American community towards visibility and empowerment.
  • To decolonize is to tell and write one’s story, that in the telling and writing, others may be encouraged to tell their own.”

“This study reveals that when the participants become critically conscious and learn to question their family experiences, they see the positive contributions of their parents and families to the decolonization process, as in, for example, the passing on of cultural practices and beliefs, in unconscious and conscious ways, to their children”

“The participants noted that the images and representations of Filipino and Filipino American culture in Filipino/Filipino American media still reflects to a large degree, a colonized mentality”

“This again, also relates to the need to build community institutions which support Filipino/Filipino American artists, writers/journalists, cultural workers and community advocates.”

“For teachers to teach an anti-racist curriculum, they must be able to question their own whiteness as an invisible category”

“Teachers must not “speak for” students but learn to “speak with,” thus avoiding what Freire calls “false charity.”

“This study has made many Filipino American issues visible by naming them: internal oppression, shame, anger, betrayal, invisibility, doubts, fear, hope, healing, and new visions”

]]>
New project! This is the first experiment of exploring books on the podcast. I'll be giving an overview Leny Strobel's Coming Full Circle: The Process of Decolonization Among Post-1965 Filipino Americans. This is a pivotal book in FilAm literature and ... Coming Full Circle is a project of decolonization based off interviews with post-1965 Filipino Americans . Through a process that Strobel calls "fishing for knowledge" through books and interviews, she organizes themes of decolonization under the categories of Naming, Reflection, and Action. This framework is greatly influenced by Paulo Friere and his idea that oppressed peoples need to name the source of their oppression before they can enact change upon it. 11 generative themes of decolonization are presented, alongside a literature review of relevant material and research.

.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-8{width:66.666666666667% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 20px;}.fusion-builder-column-8 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !important;margin-right : 3.84%;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 0px !important;margin-left : 2.88%;}@media only screen and (max-width:927px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-8{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-8 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-8{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-8 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}Support and buy a copy of the book.
.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-9{width:33.333333333333% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 20px;}.fusion-builder-column-9 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !important;margin-right : 5.76%;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 0px !important;margin-left : 3.8399999999999%;}@media only screen and (max-width:927px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-9{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-9 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-9{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-9 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-10{width:100% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 20px;}.fusion-builder-column-10 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !important;margin-right : 1.92%;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 0px !important;margin-left : 1.92%;}@media only screen and (max-width:927px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-10{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-10 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-10{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-10 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}.fusion-body .fusion-flex-container.fusion-builder-row-5{ padding-top : 4%;margin-top : 0px;padding-right : 10%;padding-bottom : 4%;margin-bottom : 0px;padding-left : 10%;}Subscribe on iTunes.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-11{width:50% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 20px;}.fusion-builder-column-11 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !]]>
KuyaChris yes
42 – Rich Bustos / LinkedIn Software Engineer Shares Insights on Coding, Minimalism, and Investing https://kuyachris.com/42-rich-bustos-linkedin-software-engineer-shares-insights-on-coding-minimalism-and-investing/ Sat, 28 Mar 2020 22:26:41 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=6285 Rich Bustos is a Filipino American engineer, videographer, and financial minimalist. He currently works as a front-end developer at LinkedIn, where he's been at for seven years. Entering the company through an internship with Year Up, Rich shares about how he was hired on even if he didn't know how to code. The passion and drive in him opened up doors and led to his current career and financial stability. In this episode, we go over his entry into the workforce through Year Up, and organization that helps under-connected youth enter the tech industry. We talk about how minimalism and meditation helped Rich work through anxiety and panic attacks. Rich also shares a lot of reflections about financial stability and investing—a very important thing for our communities to learn and develop an understanding for.

Rich Bustos is a Filipino American engineer, videographer, and financial minimalist. He currently works as a front-end developer at LinkedIn, where he’s been at for seven years. Entering the company through an internship with Year Up, Rich shares about how he was hired on even if he didn’t know how to code. The passion and drive in him opened up doors and led to his current career and financial stability. In this episode, we go over his entry into the workforce through Year Up, and organization that helps under-connected youth enter the tech industry. We talk about how minimalism and meditation helped Rich work through anxiety and panic attacks. Rich also shares a lot of reflections about financial stability and investing—a very important thing for our communities to learn and develop an understanding for.

Rich also runs the Being Rich podcast where he’s featured leaders from various fields just as jiu jitsu and entrepreneurship. He is also an avid videographer and and advocate for minimalism. Check out this pages, listen to this episode, and let us know what you think!

Shoutouts

Shout out to my boy Kevin Reber for pushing me to create content
And Kuya Chris for having me on!

kevin.reber

thebustosbros

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I love snoopy too!

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Rich Bustos is a Filipino American engineer, videographer, and financial minimalist. He currently works as a front-end developer at LinkedIn, where he's been at for seven years. Entering the company through an internship with Year Up, Rich also runs the Being Rich podcast where he's featured leaders from various fields just as jiu jitsu and entrepreneurship. He is also an avid videographer and and advocate for minimalism. Check out this pages, listen to this episode, and let us know what you think!
.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-30{width:100% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 0px;}.fusion-builder-column-30 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !important;margin-right : 0px;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 0px !important;margin-left : 0px;}@media only screen and (max-width:927px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-30{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-30 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 0px;margin-left : 0px;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-30{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-30 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 0px;margin-left : 0px;}}.fusion-body .fusion-flex-container.fusion-builder-row-16{ padding-top : 4%;margin-top : 0px;padding-right : 10%;padding-bottom : 4%;margin-bottom : 0px;padding-left : 10%;}.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-31{width:100% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 0px;}.fusion-builder-column-31 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !important;margin-right : 0px;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 0px !important;margin-left : 0px;}@media only screen and (max-width:927px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-31{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-31 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 0px;margin-left : 0px;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-31{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-31 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 0px;margin-left : 0px;}}.fusion-body .fusion-flex-container.fusion-builder-row-17{ padding-top : 4%;margin-top : 0px;padding-right : 10%;padding-bottom : 4%;margin-bottom : 0px;padding-left : 10%;}Subscribe on iTunes.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-32{width:50% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 20px;}.fusion-builder-column-32 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !important;margin-right : 3.84%;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 0px !important;margin-left : 3.84%;}@media only screen and (max-width:927px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-32{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-32 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-32{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-32 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}http://kuyachris.com/?p=5987 Nate Nevado is a Filipino American leader, Counseling Creative, and Educational Innovations Consultant. He currently works at Skyline College as a counselor and head of the Rock the School Bells conference—a hip hop educational program now in its 13th year. He is currently finishing his doctoral program at SFSU—writing about the intersection of counseling and Hip Hop Education. He’s also the founder of the CIPHER Hip Hop Learning Community at Skyline College, which provides Hip Hop education through transferrable college courses and relevant community programming. In this episode, we dive into the roots of his journey through Hip Hop and academia. From dropping out of community college to his eventual pursuit of a doctoral degree, Nate shares the multiple challenges and pivots he made throughout life to find his sense of purpose and direction. He goes over his early love for Hip Hop, the tensions within his traditional Filipino family, the doubts he had though college, and the eventual strength he found through community work and Hip Hop Education. There’s a wide range of wisdom in this episode, especially for Hip Hop heads, educators, counselors, and community workers.

Nate Nevado is a Filipino American leader, Counseling Creative, and Educational Innovations Consultant. He currently works at Skyline College as a counselor and head of the Rock the School Bells conference—a hip hop educational program now in its 13th year. He is currently finishing his doctoral program at SFSU—writing about the intersection of counseling and Hip Hop Education. He’s also the founder of the CIPHER Hip Hop Learning Community at Skyline College, which provides Hip Hop education through transferrable college courses and relevant community programming.

In this episode, we dive into the roots of his journey through Hip Hop and academia. From dropping out of community college to his eventual pursuit of a doctoral degree, Nate shares the multiple challenges and pivots he made throughout life to find his sense of purpose and direction. He goes over his early love for Hip Hop, the tensions within his traditional Filipino family, the doubts he had though college, and the eventual strength he found through community work and Hip Hop Education. There’s a wide range of wisdom in this episode, especially for Hip Hop heads, educators, counselors, and community workers.

3 Pieces of Advice

Shoutouts

Rock The School Bells + CIPHER Hip Hop Learning Community & KUYA CHRIS!!!

Rock the School Bells

]]> Nate Nevado is a Filipino American leader, Counseling Creative, and Educational Innovations Consultant. He currently works at Skyline College as a counselor and head of the Rock the School Bells conference—a hip hop educational program now in its 13th ... In this episode, we dive into the roots of his journey through Hip Hop and academia. From dropping out of community college to his eventual pursuit of a doctoral degree, Nate shares the multiple challenges and pivots he made throughout life to find his sense of purpose and direction. He goes over his early love for Hip Hop, the tensions within his traditional Filipino family, the doubts he had though college, and the eventual strength he found through community work and Hip Hop Education. There's a wide range of wisdom in this episode, especially for Hip Hop heads, educators, counselors, and community workers.
.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-55{width:100% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 0px;}.fusion-builder-column-55 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !important;margin-right : 0px;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 0px !important;margin-left : 0px;}@media only screen and (max-width:927px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-55{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-55 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 0px;margin-left : 0px;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-55{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-55 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 0px;margin-left : 0px;}}.fusion-body .fusion-flex-container.fusion-builder-row-29{ padding-top : 4%;margin-top : 0px;padding-right : 10%;padding-bottom : 4%;margin-bottom : 0px;padding-left : 10%;}@media only screen and (max-width:927px) {.fusion-title.fusion-title-11{margin-top:0px!important;margin-bottom:0.9em!important;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-title.fusion-title-11{margin-top:0px!important;margin-bottom:!important;}}3 Pieces of Advice.fusion-content-boxes-2 .heading .content-box-heading {color:#070707;}
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KuyaChris yes
40 – Marc Escobar / Drumming, Community College, UC Berkeley, Simpboi https://kuyachris.com/40-marc-escobar-drumming-community-college-uc-berkeley-simpboi/ Wed, 26 Feb 2020 00:14:55 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=5372 Marc Escobar is a FilAm journalist, poet, and drummer. Currently majoring in Political Science at UC Berkeley, he's spent majority of his time in the Bay Area—attending Westmoor High School in Daly City and transferring from Skyline College in San Bruno. Born in the Philippines, Marc shares about his childhood in San Diego and his family's eventual move to the Bay Area. He opens up about learning how to drum from his uncle and the spaces that led him to over the years—band in middle school and high school, then drumming for the Pilipino Cultural Night at UC Berkeley. In this episode, we also talk about the community college experience and transferring into UC Berkeley—social circles, authenticity, balance, and friendships.

Marc Escobar is a FilAm journalist, poet, and drummer. Currently majoring in Political Science at UC Berkeley, he’s spent majority of his time in the Bay Area—attending Westmoor High School in Daly City and transferring from Skyline College in San Bruno. Born in the Philippines, Marc shares about his childhood in San Diego and his family’s eventual move to the Bay Area. He opens up about learning how to drum from his uncle and the spaces that led him to over the years—band in middle school and high school, then drumming for the Pilipino Cultural Night at UC Berkeley. In this episode, we also talk about the community college experience and transferring into UC Berkeley—social circles, authenticity, balance, and friendships.

3 Pieces of Advice

Shoutouts

Transfer Trap House, Kelly & Katrina

UCB PASS

Kababayan Learning Community

]]>
Marc Escobar is a FilAm journalist, poet, and drummer. Currently majoring in Political Science at UC Berkeley, he's spent majority of his time in the Bay Area—attending Westmoor High School in Daly City and transferring from Skyline College in San Brun... .fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-76{width:100% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 0px;}.fusion-builder-column-76 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !important;margin-right : 0px;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 0px !important;margin-left : 0px;}@media only screen and (max-width:927px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-76{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-76 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 0px;margin-left : 0px;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-76{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-76 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 0px;margin-left : 0px;}}.fusion-body .fusion-flex-container.fusion-builder-row-41{ padding-top : 4%;margin-top : 0px;padding-right : 10%;padding-bottom : 4%;margin-bottom : 0px;padding-left : 10%;}@media only screen and (max-width:927px) {.fusion-title.fusion-title-19{margin-top:0px!important;margin-bottom:0.9em!important;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-title.fusion-title-19{margin-top:0px!important;margin-bottom:!important;}}3 Pieces of Advice.fusion-content-boxes-4 .heading .content-box-heading {color:#070707;}
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KuyaChris yes
39 – Janice Sapigao / Writer, Poet, Professor, Creative & Publication Process https://kuyachris.com/39-janice-sapigao-writer-poet-professor-creative-publication-process/ Mon, 10 Feb 2020 23:32:27 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=4958 Janice Sapigao is an accomplished writer, poet, and professor at Skyline College. Born and raised in San Jose, she finished her undergraduate degree in Ethnic Studies at UC San Diego. She then received her MFA from CalArts and has taught all throughout California. Her first book, Microchips for Millions, was first published in 2016, following by Like a Solid to a Shadow in 2017. She continues to teach at the CIPHER program at Skyline College and is an active writer and poet. In this episode, Janice shares some poetry and insight about her creative writing process. She gives her backstory and snippets of her journey as a writer—how she decided to pursue an MFA after writing for her college Pilipino Cultural Night. Janice also shares the ups and downs of balancing her career as a professor along with her work as a writer. She speaks on the process of finding a publisher for her first book and the transition to following projects.

Janice Sapigao is an accomplished writer, poet, and professor at Skyline College. Born and raised in San Jose, she finished her undergraduate degree in Ethnic Studies at UC San Diego. She then received her MFA from CalArts and has taught all throughout California. Her first book, Microchips for Millions, was first published in 2016, following by Like a Solid to a Shadow in 2017. She continues to teach at the CIPHER program at Skyline College and is an active writer and poet. In this episode, Janice shares some poetry and insight about her creative writing process. She gives her backstory and snippets of her journey as a writer—how she decided to pursue an MFA after writing for her college Pilipino Cultural Night. Janice also shares the ups and downs of balancing her career as a professor along with her work as a writer. She speaks on the process of finding a publisher for her first book and the transition to following projects.

Take a listen and let us know what you think! Follow Janice on her social media platforms and watch out for her next book (she teases a release date at the end of this episode).

3 Pieces of Advice

Shoutouts

grace burns! Angela Penaredondo! Rachelle Cruz! my mom!

Angela Peñaredondo

Rachelle Cruz

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Janice Sapigao is an accomplished writer, poet, and professor at Skyline College. Born and raised in San Jose, she finished her undergraduate degree in Ethnic Studies at UC San Diego. She then received her MFA from CalArts and has taught all throughout... Microchips for Millions, was first published in 2016, following by Like a Solid to a Shadow in 2017. She continues to teach at the CIPHER program at Skyline College and is an active writer and poet. In this episode, Janice shares some poetry and insight about her creative writing process. She gives her backstory and snippets of her journey as a writer—how she decided to pursue an MFA after writing for her college Pilipino Cultural Night. Janice also shares the ups and downs of balancing her career as a professor along with her work as a writer. She speaks on the process of finding a publisher for her first book and the transition to following projects.
Take a listen and let us know what you think! Follow Janice on her social media platforms and watch out for her next book (she teases a release date at the end of this episode).
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KuyaChris yes
38 – Mahalola Album Listening Session & Analysis / Love, Relationships, Masculinity https://kuyachris.com/38-mahalola-album-listening-session-analysis-love-relationships-masculinity/ Wed, 29 Jan 2020 22:21:47 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=4624 This episode is a listening session for KuyaChris' most recent album, Mahalola. It's a big episode at 5 hours long! We go song by song, telling any relevant stories or takeaways from the album. The homies also share their thoughts and reactions to the music. We go into a range of topics, from creativity and perfectionism to past relessonships and masculinity. There's a lot of content here, with the first song playing around the 40-minute mark.

This episode is a listening session for KuyaChris’ most recent album, Mahalola. It’s a big episode at 5 hours long! We go song by song, telling any relevant stories or takeaways from the album. The homies also share their thoughts and reactions to the music. We go into a range of topics, from creativity and perfectionism to past relessonships and masculinity. There’s a lot of content here, with the first song playing around the 40-minute mark.

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This episode is a listening session for KuyaChris' most recent album, Mahalola. It's a big episode at 5 hours long! We go song by song, telling any relevant stories or takeaways from the album. The homies also share their thoughts and reactions to the ... This episode is a listening session for KuyaChris' most recent album, Mahalola. It's a big episode at 5 hours long! We go song by song, telling any relevant stories or takeaways from the album. The homies also share their thoughts and reactions to the music. We go into a range of topics, from creativity and perfectionism to past relessonships and masculinity. There's a lot of content here, with the first song playing around the 40-minute mark. KuyaChris yes 5:11:59 This episode is a listening session for KuyaChris' most recent album, Mahalola. It's a big episode at 5 hours long! We go song by song, telling any relevant stories or takeaways from the album. The homies also share their thoughts and reactions to the music. We go into a range of topics, from creativity and perfectionism to past relessonships and masculinity. There's a lot of content here, with the first song playing around the 40-minute mark.
37 – Angela Hien / Multidisciplinary Creative, Educator, UC Berkeley, Art Practice https://kuyachris.com/37-angela-hien-multidisciplinary-creative-educator-uc-berkeley-art-practice/ Tue, 24 Dec 2019 00:40:11 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=3542 Angela Hien is a multidisciplinary creative who uses a variety of mediums—from sculture and installations to audio and singings—to express her experience as a Vietnapina American. She was born in Sacramento, CA to a Vietnamese father and a Filipina mother. She recently finished studying Art Practice and Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley, with plans to go into education in the future. In this episode, we talk about her creative process, her experience as a Vietnamese/Filipina American, and her experience going back to the Philippines and Vietnam this last summer. She participated in UC Berkekey's inaugural study abroad program (along with previous guest Joshua Laurel) and we go over her experiences and takeaways. She also sings two cover songs and two originals! Additionally, we go over her art portfolio in the end, deconstructing how she creates and approaches her art practice.

Angela Hien is a multidisciplinary creative who uses a variety of mediums—from sculture and installations to audio and singings—to express her experience as a Vietnapina American. She was born in Sacramento, CA to a Vietnamese father and a Filipina mother. She recently finished studying Art Practice and Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley, with plans to go into education in the future. In this episode, we talk about her creative process, her experience as a Vietnamese/Filipina American, and her experience going back to the Philippines and Vietnam this last summer. She participated in UC Berkekey’s inaugural study abroad program (along with previous guest Joshua Laurel) and we go over her experiences and takeaways.

She also sings two cover songs and two originals! Additionally, we go over her art portfolio in the end, deconstructing how she creates and approaches her art practice.

Pieces of Advice

Shoutouts

@maganda.magazine (submit to Babae!) and @raicestexas (follow and donate!)

maganda.morenita

raicestexas

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Angela Hien is a multidisciplinary creative who uses a variety of mediums—from sculture and installations to audio and singings—to express her experience as a Vietnapina American. She was born in Sacramento, Angela Hien is a multidisciplinary creative who uses a variety of mediums—from sculture and installations to audio and singings—to express her experience as a Vietnapina American. She was born in Sacramento, CA to a Vietnamese father and a Filipina mother. She recently finished studying Art Practice and Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley, with plans to go into education in the future. In this episode, we talk about her creative process, her experience as a Vietnamese/Filipina American, and her experience going back to the Philippines and Vietnam this last summer. She participated in UC Berkekey's inaugural study abroad program (along with previous guest Joshua Laurel) and we go over her experiences and takeaways.<br /> <br /> She also sings two cover songs and two originals! Additionally, we go over her art portfolio in the end, deconstructing how she creates and approaches her art practice. KuyaChris yes 2:39:04 Angela Hien is a multidisciplinary creative who uses a variety of mediums—from sculture and installations to audio and singings—to express her experience as a Vietnapina American. She was born in Sacramento, CA to a Vietnamese father and a Filipina mother. She recently finished studying Art Practice and Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley, with plans to go into education in the future. In this episode, we talk about her creative process, her experience as a Vietnamese/Filipina American, and her experience going back to the Philippines and Vietnam this last summer. She participated in UC Berkekey's inaugural study abroad program (along with previous guest Joshua Laurel) and we go over her experiences and takeaways.<br /> <br /> She also sings two cover songs and two originals! Additionally, we go over her art portfolio in the end, deconstructing how she creates and approaches her art practice.
36 – Zaldy Tubig / Rapper, Creative, Creating Music, SF History, Therapy https://kuyachris.com/36-zaldy-tubig-rapper-creative-creating-music-sf-history-therapy/ Tue, 03 Dec 2019 03:06:41 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=3249 Zaldy Tubig is a rapper, musician, and creative based out of the Bay Area. With roots in the SoMa distrct of San Francisco, he has a rich history and knowledge of the Bay and the city—especially in regards to the Filipino community and culture of SoMa Pilipinas. In this episode, we talk about his beginnings with music and writing—from peotry and music sessions at Y Projects to his current work and releases with local Bay Area artists. On the podcast, Zaldy performs some of his recent tracks, in addition to pieces from his debut mixtape THERAPY VOLUME 1. Zaldy recently changed his stage name to Zaldy Water—we talk about the history of his name and the connections with his father and the Philippines. Throughout the episode, Zaldy drops some serious wisdom and reflections in regards to growing up in working-class neighborhoods and the growth he's gone through in his life.

Zaldy Tubig is a rapper, musician, and creative based out of the Bay Area. With roots in the SoMa distrct of San Francisco, he has a rich history and knowledge of the Bay and the city—especially in regards to the Filipino community and culture of SoMa Pilipinas. In this episode, we talk about his beginnings with music and writing—from peotry and music sessions at Y Projects to his current work and releases with local Bay Area artists. On the podcast, Zaldy performs some of his recent tracks, in addition to pieces from his debut mixtape THERAPY VOLUME 1. Zaldy recently changed his stage name to Zaldy Water—we talk about the history of his name and the connections with his father and the Philippines. Throughout the episode, Zaldy drops some serious wisdom and reflections in regards to growing up in working-class neighborhoods and the growth he’s gone through in his life.

Watch out for his upcoming project Stop Watering Dead Plants, soon to be released in collaboration with Niko Stephen.

3 Pieces of Advice

Shoutouts

To my brother NIKø and My family

nikostephen

darrellmedellin

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Zaldy Tubig is a rapper, musician, and creative based out of the Bay Area. With roots in the SoMa distrct of San Francisco, he has a rich history and knowledge of the Bay and the city—especially in regards to the Filipino community and culture of SoMa ... Zaldy Tubig is a rapper, musician, and creative based out of the Bay Area. With roots in the SoMa distrct of San Francisco, he has a rich history and knowledge of the Bay and the city—especially in regards to the Filipino community and culture of SoMa Pilipinas. In this episode, we talk about his beginnings with music and writing—from peotry and music sessions at Y Projects to his current work and releases with local Bay Area artists. On the podcast, Zaldy performs some of his recent tracks, in addition to pieces from his debut mixtape THERAPY VOLUME 1. Zaldy recently changed his stage name to Zaldy Water—we talk about the history of his name and the connections with his father and the Philippines. Throughout the episode, Zaldy drops some serious wisdom and reflections in regards to growing up in working-class neighborhoods and the growth he's gone through in his life. KuyaChris yes 2:20:38 Zaldy Tubig is a rapper, musician, and creative based out of the Bay Area. With roots in the SoMa distrct of San Francisco, he has a rich history and knowledge of the Bay and the city—especially in regards to the Filipino community and culture of SoMa Pilipinas. In this episode, we talk about his beginnings with music and writing—from peotry and music sessions at Y Projects to his current work and releases with local Bay Area artists. On the podcast, Zaldy performs some of his recent tracks, in addition to pieces from his debut mixtape THERAPY VOLUME 1. Zaldy recently changed his stage name to Zaldy Water—we talk about the history of his name and the connections with his father and the Philippines. Throughout the episode, Zaldy drops some serious wisdom and reflections in regards to growing up in working-class neighborhoods and the growth he's gone through in his life.
35 – Joshua Laurel / Pagibig, Study Abroad, Public Health, UC Berkeley https://kuyachris.com/35-joshua-laurel-pagibig-study-abroad-public-health-uc-berkeley/ Tue, 15 Oct 2019 23:19:48 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=3173 Joshua Laurel is a Public Health major student at UC Berkeley, set to graduate this 2020! He went to the Philippines this last summer and studied at UP Diliman, through UC Berkeley's first Study Abroad initiative in the Philippines. In this episode, we talk about his experience during study abroad—going back to study at his home country's top public university—and any major takeways or lessons he learned. We also talk about a range of topics, such as pagibig and the cultural differences in terms of dating and relatioships between the Philippines and the United States. Joshua also shares his immigration story of moving to the United States at 12 years old and the process of acclimating to a new environment.

Joshua Laurel is a Public Health major student at UC Berkeley, set to graduate this 2020! He went to the Philippines this last summer and studied at UP Diliman, through UC Berkeley’s first Study Abroad initiative in the Philippines. In this episode, we talk about his experience during study abroad—going back to study at his home country’s top public university—and any major takeways or lessons he learned. We also talk about a range of topics, such as pagibig and the cultural differences in terms of dating and relatioships between the Philippines and the United States. Joshua also shares his immigration story of moving to the United States at 12 years old and the process of acclimating to a new environment.

3 Pieces of Advice

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Joshua Laurel is a Public Health major student at UC Berkeley, set to graduate this 2020! He went to the Philippines this last summer and studied at UP Diliman, through UC Berkeley's first Study Abroad initiative in the Philippines. In this episode, Joshua Laurel is a Public Health major student at UC Berkeley, set to graduate this 2020! He went to the Philippines this last summer and studied at UP Diliman, through UC Berkeley's first Study Abroad initiative in the Philippines. In this episode, we talk about his experience during study abroad—going back to study at his home country's top public university—and any major takeways or lessons he learned. We also talk about a range of topics, such as pagibig and the cultural differences in terms of dating and relatioships between the Philippines and the United States. Joshua also shares his immigration story of moving to the United States at 12 years old and the process of acclimating to a new environment. KuyaChris yes 2:01:35 Joshua Laurel is a Public Health major student at UC Berkeley, set to graduate this 2020! He went to the Philippines this last summer and studied at UP Diliman, through UC Berkeley's first Study Abroad initiative in the Philippines. In this episode, we talk about his experience during study abroad—going back to study at his home country's top public university—and any major takeways or lessons he learned. We also talk about a range of topics, such as pagibig and the cultural differences in terms of dating and relatioships between the Philippines and the United States. Joshua also shares his immigration story of moving to the United States at 12 years old and the process of acclimating to a new environment.
34 – Kudazzers / Filipino Podcasts, Flavor of Cum, Queer Theory, Theater https://kuyachris.com/34-kudazzers-filipino-podcasts-flavor-of-cum-queer-theory-theater/ Fri, 30 Aug 2019 06:51:24 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=3054 Kudazzers is a podcast based in the Philippines—made for and by Gen Z and Gen Y locals—hosted by Iris Montesclaros, Eudes Garcia, Natalie Estrada, Ingrid Joyce, and Martin Glen. In this episode, two of the hosts talk about the beginnings of the Kudazzers podcast and their plans moving forward. We also get into a range of topics, spanning from the concept of "bayawaks" who challenge the beauty standards of the Philippines and queer theory as situated within the Philippine context. Check out their podcast on Spotify and other platforms—it's guaranteed to be hilarious.

Kudazzers is a podcast based in the Philippines—made for and by Gen Z and Gen Y locals—hosted by Iris Montesclaros, Eudes Garcia, Natalie Estrada, Ingrid Joyce, and Martin Glen. In this episode, two of the hosts talk about the beginnings of the Kudazzers podcast and their plans moving forward. We also get into a range of topics, spanning from the concept of “bayawaks” who challenge the beauty standards of the Philippines and queer theory as situated within the Philippine context.

Check out their podcast on Spotify and other platforms—it’s guaranteed to be hilarious. I personally listened to the episode “Malaki Ba Siya, o Masikip Lang Ako?” and was laughing all throughout. Most of their episodes are about 30 minutes—the perfect length to listen to on a commute—and they usually focus on a single topic. The beauty of their conversations is that they’re honest, uncensored, and open—and hilarious. Take a listen, follow, and subscribe.

Personal Pages

irismontesclaros

theeudesgarcia

View this post on Instagram

my today’s a good day face

A post shared by Eudes Anthony (@theeudesgarcia) on

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Kudazzers is a podcast based in the Philippines—made for and by Gen Z and Gen Y locals—hosted by Iris Montesclaros, Eudes Garcia, Natalie Estrada, Ingrid Joyce, and Martin Glen. In this episode, two of the hosts talk about the beginnings of the Kudazze... Kudazzers is a podcast based in the Philippines—made for and by Gen Z and Gen Y locals—hosted by Iris Montesclaros, Eudes Garcia, Natalie Estrada, Ingrid Joyce, and Martin Glen. In this episode, two of the hosts talk about the beginnings of the Kudazzers podcast and their plans moving forward. We also get into a range of topics, spanning from the concept of "bayawaks" who challenge the beauty standards of the Philippines and queer theory as situated within the Philippine context. Check out their podcast on Spotify and other platforms—it's guaranteed to be hilarious. KuyaChris yes 2:27:09 Kudazzers is a podcast based in the Philippines—made for and by Gen Z and Gen Y locals—hosted by Iris Montesclaros, Eudes Garcia, Natalie Estrada, Ingrid Joyce, and Martin Glen. In this episode, two of the hosts talk about the beginnings of the Kudazzers podcast and their plans moving forward. We also get into a range of topics, spanning from the concept of "bayawaks" who challenge the beauty standards of the Philippines and queer theory as situated within the Philippine context. Check out their podcast on Spotify and other platforms—it's guaranteed to be hilarious.
33 – BC Poppas Jojo & Jon / Street Kids, Detention Center, Bacolod, Jiu Jitsu https://kuyachris.com/33-bc-poppas-jojo-jon-street-kids-detention-center-bacolod-jiu-jitsu/ Fri, 09 Aug 2019 07:05:03 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=3009 BC Poppas is the podcast, project, and platform of two jiu jitsu brown belts from Bacolod City, Philippines—Jojo and Jon. Born and raised in Bacolod City, Jojo knows the local context and life of the region, making him a perfectly-suited to work with the various communities in the area. In this podcast, he talks about his work with street children—majority of them in gangs or affected by drug use—and his development as a community leader and mentor. Jon shares more about his work and perspective regarding the Nothing 2 Lose Foundation and the outreach programs they are currently pursing. Both Jojo and Jon run a jiu jitsu gym in Bacolod City—BC Martial—while also working with "youth in conflict with the law" at the local Social Development Center where youth who have been arrested await sentencing. BC Poppas is the podcast, project, and platform of two jiu jitsu brown belts from Bacolod City, Philippines—Jojo and Jon. Born and raised in Bacolod City, Jojo knows the local context and life of the region, We recorded this episode on Guimaras Island after visiting the Regional Rehabilitation Youth Center of Region VI. Due to the work of both Jojo and Jon, we were able to visit the facility where youth serve out their sentences—majority of the youth there were sentenced before they were 18 and will be released by the time they turn 21. We talk about the basketball and music outreach we conducted and their plans to develop an aftercare program for the youth released and returning to Bacolod City.
NOTE: Sorry for the blurry video.
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KuyaChris yes 2:13:24
32 – Bettina Francisco / Rapper, Energy, Ancestors, Mental Health https://kuyachris.com/32-bettina-francisco-rapper-energy-ancestors-mental-health/ Mon, 17 Jun 2019 11:21:52 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2993 Bettina Francisco is a student, musician, creative, and emcee based out of San Francisco, California. Currently, she is an RA at USF and is majoring in Critical Diversity Studies and Philippine Studies. Having spent a lot of time meditating and reflecting on her own energies, she shares her personal self-care practices and relationship with mental health. In this episode, we cover a wide range of topics, including her relationship with ancestors and intergenerational trauma. Bettina also shares beautiful creative pieces—a few about her daughter that passed away. In this episode, she also talked about her creative process and how she began writing raps. She shares a realization that: "I need to heal myself before I write something." Listen to her thoughts, reflections, and perspective on love and energy. Bettina Francisco is a student, musician, creative, and emcee based out of San Francisco, California. Currently, she is an RA at USF and is majoring in Critical Diversity Studies and Philippine Studies. Having spent a lot of time meditating and reflect... Bettina Francisco is a student, musician, creative, and emcee based out of San Francisco, California. Currently, she is an RA at USF and is majoring in Critical Diversity Studies and Philippine Studies. Having spent a lot of time meditating and reflecting on her own energies, she shares her personal self-care practices and relationship with mental health. In this episode, we cover a wide range of topics, including her relationship with ancestors and intergenerational trauma. Bettina also shares beautiful creative pieces—a few about her daughter that passed away. In this episode, she also talked about her creative process and how she began writing raps. She shares a realization that: "I need to heal myself before I write something." Listen to her thoughts, reflections, and perspective on love and energy. KuyaChris yes 2:08:11 31 – Rudy Kalma / Rapper, Audio Engineer, Labor of Love https://kuyachris.com/31-rudy-kalma-rapper-audio-engineer-labor-of-love/ Sun, 14 Apr 2019 09:33:25 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2976 Rudy Kalma is a Filipino American musician, rapper, producer, and audio engineer, currently based out of Sacramento, California. Born in the Philippines, Rudy eventually moved to California, growing up around San Francisco & Daly City, before attending UC Davis for undergrad. After finding his love for making music and rapping in high school, he continued to hone his live performance skills while simultaneously releasing a multitude of songs throughout his college career. In 2018, he released a full-length project titled "Labor of Love" and continued to perform on local stages and events. Using a mix of elements for his album—from Tagalog sequences to a wide range of hip hop beats—Rudy delivers a uniquely mellow yet upbeat rap album. He tells a story of immigration, meditation, reflection, and the continued process of trying to find stability as a musician. Adding more to the impressiveness of this album, Rudy mixed all the tracks as well, displaying his skills as an audio engineer. Rudy Kalma is a Filipino American musician, rapper, producer, and audio engineer, currently based out of Sacramento, California. Born in the Philippines, Rudy eventually moved to California, growing up around San Francisco & Daly City, Rudy Kalma is a Filipino American musician, rapper, producer, and audio engineer, currently based out of Sacramento, California. Born in the Philippines, Rudy eventually moved to California, growing up around San Francisco & Daly City, before attending UC Davis for undergrad. After finding his love for making music and rapping in high school, he continued to hone his live performance skills while simultaneously releasing a multitude of songs throughout his college career. In 2018, he released a full-length project titled "Labor of Love" and continued to perform on local stages and events. Using a mix of elements for his album—from Tagalog sequences to a wide range of hip hop beats—Rudy delivers a uniquely mellow yet upbeat rap album. He tells a story of immigration, meditation, reflection, and the continued process of trying to find stability as a musician. Adding more to the impressiveness of this album, Rudy mixed all the tracks as well, displaying his skills as an audio engineer. KuyaChris yes 2:20:45 30 – Pogi Boi Run Club / Running Challenge, Reflection, Rogan, Goggins https://kuyachris.com/30-pogi-boi-run-club-running-challenge-reflection-rogan-goggins/ Sun, 17 Mar 2019 07:22:11 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2949 This last February, four Filipino bois participated in a challenge—The Pogi Boi GoPro Challenge. Using the MapMyRun app, we decided that whoever ran the most miles in the month would win a Gopro, and the losers would chip in to pay for it. We had Joshua Berja, Christian Guerrero, Joseph Magsaysay, and Kevin Reber participating in this challenge. In the end, Mr. Reber came out on top with a total of 108.57 miles! In this podcast session, we talk about our experiences, the takeaways from the runs, our reflections, and thoughts for another challenge. Overall it was a fun experience where we all collectively got better and improved, even with challenges throughout. This last February, four Filipino bois participated in a challenge—The Pogi Boi GoPro Challenge. Using the MapMyRun app, we decided that whoever ran the most miles in the month would win a Gopro, and the losers would chip in to pay for it. This last February, four Filipino bois participated in a challenge—The Pogi Boi GoPro Challenge. Using the MapMyRun app, we decided that whoever ran the most miles in the month would win a Gopro, and the losers would chip in to pay for it. We had Joshua Berja, Christian Guerrero, Joseph Magsaysay, and Kevin Reber participating in this challenge. In the end, Mr. Reber came out on top with a total of 108.57 miles! In this podcast session, we talk about our experiences, the takeaways from the runs, our reflections, and thoughts for another challenge. Overall it was a fun experience where we all collectively got better and improved, even with challenges throughout. KuyaChris yes 2:18:23 29 – Mykho Magalong / Drummer, Designer, SFxDC, Balikbayans https://kuyachris.com/29-mykho-magalong-drummer-designer-sfxdc-balikbayans/ Sat, 09 Mar 2019 06:05:46 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2942 Mykho Magalong is a Filipino American drummer, musician, designer, and owner of the streetwear brand SFxDC. Born and raised in Quezon City, Philippines, he immigrated to the United States when he was around 14 years old. Entering Balboa High School, he was exposed to the hyphy movement in the Bay Area and eventually joined local music groups—Boondock Squad and Doble Bara. In the last few years, he launched his clothing brand SFxDC after making some clothes for friends, the Sorry Ser Crew. He's continually working on his brand, releasing new designs, and expanding his creative outlets—a community magazine is now in the works. Additionally, he continues to play the drums for a variety of music groups—most recently with Ruby Ibarra and the Balikbayans. In this episode, he plays some live drums, talks about his relationship to music, and his vision for SFxDC. Additionally, he shares reflections about working as a caregiver and the thoughts that experience has brought about, especially in terms of caring for family and his elders. Mykho Magalong is a Filipino American drummer, musician, designer, and owner of the streetwear brand SFxDC. Born and raised in Quezon City, Philippines, he immigrated to the United States when he was around 14 years old. Entering Balboa High School, Mykho Magalong is a Filipino American drummer, musician, designer, and owner of the streetwear brand SFxDC. Born and raised in Quezon City, Philippines, he immigrated to the United States when he was around 14 years old. Entering Balboa High School, he was exposed to the hyphy movement in the Bay Area and eventually joined local music groups—Boondock Squad and Doble Bara. In the last few years, he launched his clothing brand SFxDC after making some clothes for friends, the Sorry Ser Crew. He's continually working on his brand, releasing new designs, and expanding his creative outlets—a community magazine is now in the works. Additionally, he continues to play the drums for a variety of music groups—most recently with Ruby Ibarra and the Balikbayans. In this episode, he plays some live drums, talks about his relationship to music, and his vision for SFxDC. Additionally, he shares reflections about working as a caregiver and the thoughts that experience has brought about, especially in terms of caring for family and his elders. KuyaChris yes 2:41:16 28 – Isabel Bagsik / Graphic Designer, UC Davis, Brown Papaya https://kuyachris.com/28-isabel-bagsik-graphic-designer-uc-davis-brown-papaya/ Fri, 01 Feb 2019 07:47:35 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2928 Isabel Bagsik is a Filipina American graphic designer and creative who recently published the Brown Papaya magazine project—an initiative to challenge the colonized beauty standards of the Filipinx community—one where skin whitening products dominate the beauty industry. The Brown Papaya project aims to "reclaim and embrace darker, brown sunkissed skin" and counteract the negative stereotypes attached to that aesthetic. Born in Pasay City, Philippines, Isabel was brought to the US as a child and grew up in the Bay Area, eventually graduating from UC Davis with double B.A. degrees in Design and Technocultural Studies. She has worked as a designer with students organizations and larger groups such as Kaiser Permanente in Oakland. She is currently working at the Communication Arts magazine as a Design and Production Associate while simultaneously developing her own personal design portfolio and projects. Isabel Bagsik is a Filipina American graphic designer and creative who recently published the Brown Papaya magazine project—an initiative to challenge the colonized beauty standards of the Filipinx community—one where skin whitening products dominate t... Isabel Bagsik is a Filipina American graphic designer and creative who recently published the Brown Papaya magazine project—an initiative to challenge the colonized beauty standards of the Filipinx community—one where skin whitening products dominate the beauty industry. The Brown Papaya project aims to "reclaim and embrace darker, brown sunkissed skin" and counteract the negative stereotypes attached to that aesthetic. Born in Pasay City, Philippines, Isabel was brought to the US as a child and grew up in the Bay Area, eventually graduating from UC Davis with double B.A. degrees in Design and Technocultural Studies. She has worked as a designer with students organizations and larger groups such as Kaiser Permanente in Oakland. She is currently working at the Communication Arts magazine as a Design and Production Associate while simultaneously developing her own personal design portfolio and projects. KuyaChris yes 2:38:01 27 – Angelo Lirazan / 626, College, US Army Reserve, Coding, Entrepreneur https://kuyachris.com/27-angelo-lirazan-626-college-us-army-reserve-coding-entrepreneur/ Mon, 14 Jan 2019 23:01:47 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2911 Angelo Lirazan is a Filipino American entrepreneur based out of the 626 region of Los Angeles, CA—land of the boba. He currently runs Absolve Gaming, an online reseller of trading cards, while also consulting on website development and marketing projects. In this episode, we go over his history of being born in California, moving back to the Philippines, spending a few years in Hawai'i, and returning to Los Angeles for the remainder of his primary schooling. After graduating high school from Don Bosco Technical Institute in Rosemead, he ended up joining the US Army Reserve in order to pay for college. Once entering the professional workforce, he reached the position of Marketing Director for a large tent-manufacturing company, managing a budget of up to $1mil/year for advertising. After working this job and a few others, he decided to pursue running his own business full-time. We talk about this journey, the ups and downs, the challenges, and the reasoning behind his decisions. Angelo Lirazan is a Filipino American entrepreneur based out of the 626 region of Los Angeles, CA—land of the boba. He currently runs Absolve Gaming, an online reseller of trading cards, while also consulting on website development and marketing projec... Angelo Lirazan is a Filipino American entrepreneur based out of the 626 region of Los Angeles, CA—land of the boba. He currently runs Absolve Gaming, an online reseller of trading cards, while also consulting on website development and marketing projects. In this episode, we go over his history of being born in California, moving back to the Philippines, spending a few years in Hawai'i, and returning to Los Angeles for the remainder of his primary schooling. After graduating high school from Don Bosco Technical Institute in Rosemead, he ended up joining the US Army Reserve in order to pay for college. Once entering the professional workforce, he reached the position of Marketing Director for a large tent-manufacturing company, managing a budget of up to $1mil/year for advertising. After working this job and a few others, he decided to pursue running his own business full-time. We talk about this journey, the ups and downs, the challenges, and the reasoning behind his decisions. KuyaChris yes 2:15:46 26 – MC Zuko / Rapper, CSUN, Family, Infidelity, Decolonization https://kuyachris.com/26-mc-zuko-rapper-csun-family-infidelity-decolonization/ Tue, 18 Dec 2018 00:16:59 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2863 MC Zuko is a FilAm rapper and Hip Hop artist based out of Los Angeles, CA. Born Carl Viray, he's lived in both NorCal and SoCal, eventually graduating from Cal State University, Northridge. He recently released his "Respect the Hustle Mixtape" and it's officially flames. In this episode, Zuko performs a number of his tracks and talks about his journey towards pursuing music full-time. Through the lens of the 5 stages of grief, Zuko tells his story from childhood to present-day, relating his journey through music as a process of decolonization. We also get personal—deconstructing family dynamics, infidelity, and reflections of what type of men we want to be. This is a beautifully introspective episode with a lot of gems and little nuggets of wisdom. Go shoot him a follow, listen to his music, and get inspired. MC Zuko is a FilAm rapper and Hip Hop artist based out of Los Angeles, CA. Born Carl Viray, he's lived in both NorCal and SoCal, eventually graduating from Cal State University, Northridge. He recently released his "Respect the Hustle Mixtape" and it's... MC Zuko is a FilAm rapper and Hip Hop artist based out of Los Angeles, CA. Born Carl Viray, he's lived in both NorCal and SoCal, eventually graduating from Cal State University, Northridge. He recently released his "Respect the Hustle Mixtape" and it's officially flames. In this episode, Zuko performs a number of his tracks and talks about his journey towards pursuing music full-time. Through the lens of the 5 stages of grief, Zuko tells his story from childhood to present-day, relating his journey through music as a process of decolonization. We also get personal—deconstructing family dynamics, infidelity, and reflections of what type of men we want to be. This is a beautifully introspective episode with a lot of gems and little nuggets of wisdom. Go shoot him a follow, listen to his music, and get inspired. KuyaChris yes 1:58:08 25 – Raquel Calara / Community Immersion, Kabataan Alliance, UC Berkeley, PCN https://kuyachris.com/25-raquel-calara-community-immersion-kabataan-alliance-uc-berkeley-pcn/ Mon, 03 Dec 2018 00:14:07 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2818 Raquel Calara is a student organizer currently majoring in Social Welfare at UC Berkeley. She is the SHADOW Coordinator for Pilipinx Academic Student Services (PASS) and is also one of this year's Pilipinx Cultural Night co-producers. This last summer, she traveled to the Philippines with Kabataan Alliance for a community immersion trip where she visited striking workers, fisherfolk communities, indigenous Aeta groups, and activist organizations. In this episode, she reflects on the significance of this trip—being only the 2nd time she's been in the Philippines—and the various takeaways she's gotten from the experience. She explores the implications of the striking NutriAsia workers, the importance and relevance of activism, and the shifts this trip has had on her future trajectory as both a student and community organizer. There's also a lot of reflections about growing up as a Filipina in the United States, the initial distancing from her culture, and the rediscovery and acceptance of identity while in college. Raquel Calara is a student organizer currently majoring in Social Welfare at UC Berkeley. She is the SHADOW Coordinator for Pilipinx Academic Student Services (PASS) and is also one of this year's Pilipinx Cultural Night co-producers. Raquel Calara is a student organizer currently majoring in Social Welfare at UC Berkeley. She is the SHADOW Coordinator for Pilipinx Academic Student Services (PASS) and is also one of this year's Pilipinx Cultural Night co-producers. This last summer, she traveled to the Philippines with Kabataan Alliance for a community immersion trip where she visited striking workers, fisherfolk communities, indigenous Aeta groups, and activist organizations. In this episode, she reflects on the significance of this trip—being only the 2nd time she's been in the Philippines—and the various takeaways she's gotten from the experience. She explores the implications of the striking NutriAsia workers, the importance and relevance of activism, and the shifts this trip has had on her future trajectory as both a student and community organizer. There's also a lot of reflections about growing up as a Filipina in the United States, the initial distancing from her culture, and the rediscovery and acceptance of identity while in college. KuyaChris yes 2:16:01 24 – Kevin Bradley Paule / UC Berkeley, Queerness, PCN, Media Studies https://kuyachris.com/24-kevin-bradley-paule-uc-berkeley-queerness-pcn-media-studies/ Mon, 01 Oct 2018 06:05:44 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2727 Kevin Bradley Paule is a Pilipinx community organizer, political activist, and storyteller who's currently in the Media Studies program at UC Berkeley. He is this year's Recruitment Director for Pilipinx Academic Student Services (PASS) and we was last year's Co-Producer for UC Berkeley's Pilipino Cultural Night—Umaalab. In this episode, Kevin talks about his experience growing up in Southern California and his transition into UC Berkeley as a first-generation Filipino college student. He explores the intersection between identifying as queer and Filipino—both the struggles and the support he's received—closing with how he's been able to find a sense of self and stability. Kevin Bradley Paule is a Pilipinx community organizer, political activist, and storyteller who's currently in the Media Studies program at UC Berkeley. He is this year's Recruitment Director for Pilipinx Academic Student Services (PASS) and we was last... Kevin Bradley Paule is a Pilipinx community organizer, political activist, and storyteller who's currently in the Media Studies program at UC Berkeley. He is this year's Recruitment Director for Pilipinx Academic Student Services (PASS) and we was last year's Co-Producer for UC Berkeley's Pilipino Cultural Night—Umaalab. In this episode, Kevin talks about his experience growing up in Southern California and his transition into UC Berkeley as a first-generation Filipino college student. He explores the intersection between identifying as queer and Filipino—both the struggles and the support he's received—closing with how he's been able to find a sense of self and stability. KuyaChris yes 2:03:08 23 – Jed Lee / Global Poverty & Practice, Berkeley, Philippines, Practice Experience, Activism https://kuyachris.com/23-jed-lee-global-poverty-practice-berkeley-philippines-practice-experience-activism/ Thu, 06 Sep 2018 18:01:52 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2707 Jed Lee is a Chinese-Filipino Taiwanese-American who's studying at UC Berkeley. He's currently majoring in Society & Environment while also minoring in Global Poverty & Practice, Food Systems, and City Planning. This summer of 2018, Jed traveled to the Philippines and worked with the IBON Foundation for the Practice Experience component of his GPP minor. Jed shares his reflection of being in the Philippines, seeing the differences and inequalities, especially from a privileged first-world perspective, while also trying to find ways to advocate for both the environment and marginalized communities. He talks about his experience within the Global Poverty & Practice minor, in addition to some reflections regarding "sustainable development," activism, and other complicated topics related to poverty alleviation. Jed Lee is a Chinese-Filipino Taiwanese-American who's studying at UC Berkeley. He's currently majoring in Society & Environment while also minoring in Global Poverty & Practice, Food Systems, and City Planning. This summer of 2018, Jed Lee is a Chinese-Filipino Taiwanese-American who's studying at UC Berkeley. He's currently majoring in Society & Environment while also minoring in Global Poverty & Practice, Food Systems, and City Planning. This summer of 2018, Jed traveled to the Philippines and worked with the IBON Foundation for the Practice Experience component of his GPP minor. Jed shares his reflection of being in the Philippines, seeing the differences and inequalities, especially from a privileged first-world perspective, while also trying to find ways to advocate for both the environment and marginalized communities. He talks about his experience within the Global Poverty & Practice minor, in addition to some reflections regarding "sustainable development," activism, and other complicated topics related to poverty alleviation. KuyaChris yes 2:09:00 22 – Jon Tulio / Nothing to Lose Foundation, Jiu Jitsu, Bacolod https://kuyachris.com/22-jon-tulio-nothing-to-lose-foundation-jiu-jitsu-bacolod/ Tue, 21 Aug 2018 00:01:40 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2685 Jon Tulio is a Filipino American educator, father, and director of the Nothing to Lose (N2L) Foundation, which operates in the Philippines. N2L runs a scholarship program where the top basketball and volleyball players in the Romblon province are brought together for an all-star camp, in addition to offering full-ride college scholarships to selected leaders and community members. John co-launched this organization in 2006, alongside a fellow educator and high school basketball coach—Michael Ferolino. The two started a summer all-star camp in Romblon, and their initiative has expanded to include a volleyball program and medical missions throughout the area. N2L has also been able to successfully support numerous scholars throughout their college education—covering costs—with some scholars coming back to work as staff for the organization. Jon Tulio is a Filipino American educator, father, and director of the Nothing to Lose (N2L) Foundation, which operates in the Philippines. N2L runs a scholarship program where the top basketball and volleyball players in the Romblon province are broug...
Jon also shares his journey from becoming a high school basketball coach in Northern California to traveling and moving his family to the Philippines in order to pursue foundation work full-time. He is also helping launch a new initiative in Bacolod City to reach out and support "youth in conflict with the law." He shares his perspective on leadership development and the similarities between the youth he sees in his scholarship program and the youth within these detention centers. There is a need to support these often forgotten and overlooked populations.

Please listen to the episode, reflect on the stories, learn jiu jitsu, and reach out to support.

PS. Sorry for the audio quality. This was the first time trying to record abroad and out of the studio. Lesson learned and will be able to record better quality next time.

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KuyaChris yes 2:25:02
21 – Niko Stephen / Musician, Love, UC Berkeley, Soul Vision https://kuyachris.com/21-niko-stephen-musician-love-uc-berkeley-soul-vision/ Sat, 02 Jun 2018 23:40:44 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2665 Niko Stephen is a Filipino American / Pilipinx producer, DJ, and singer who has grown up in Union City, California. As a musician, he has a background playing brass and bass instruments, with a solid background in Jazz and competitive marching band. He is an alumni of UC Berkeley, having graduated in 2016 with a degree in Public Health, and was active in on-campus organizations such as PASS (Pilipinx Academic Student Services). He's a member of the music collective Soul Vision, and is currently active as musician in the bay area—producing, performing, and DJing music. In this episode, we talk about range of topics from music fundamentals to our thoughts on love and masculinity. We go over Niko's reflections about being a man of color in America, along with lessons learned from his time in student organizations. Throughout the session, Niko also drops mad musical skills, performing three songs (he produced all the instrumentals) and freestyling over one his beats in the end. Come listen, tell us what you think, and be inspired to get your music game up. Niko Stephen is a Filipino American / Pilipinx producer, DJ, and singer who has grown up in Union City, California. As a musician, he has a background playing brass and bass instruments, with a solid background in Jazz and competitive marching band. Niko Stephen is a Filipino American / Pilipinx producer, DJ, and singer who has grown up in Union City, California. As a musician, he has a background playing brass and bass instruments, with a solid background in Jazz and competitive marching band. He is an alumni of UC Berkeley, having graduated in 2016 with a degree in Public Health, and was active in on-campus organizations such as PASS (Pilipinx Academic Student Services). He's a member of the music collective Soul Vision, and is currently active as musician in the bay area—producing, performing, and DJing music. In this episode, we talk about range of topics from music fundamentals to our thoughts on love and masculinity. We go over Niko's reflections about being a man of color in America, along with lessons learned from his time in student organizations. Throughout the session, Niko also drops mad musical skills, performing three songs (he produced all the instrumentals) and freestyling over one his beats in the end. Come listen, tell us what you think, and be inspired to get your music game up. KuyaChris yes 2:26:21 20 – Joy Ng / Asian American Writer, Community Service Worker, I-Hotel Manilatown https://kuyachris.com/20-joy-ng-asian-american-writer-community-service-worker-i-hotel-manilatown/ Sun, 01 Apr 2018 06:45:55 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2645 Joy Ng is an Asian American writer, community service worker, and events organizer from San Francisco, California. Born and raised in The City, she’s worked with numerous Filipino American organizations, ranging from PACE at SFSU to the Veteran’s Equity Center in SoMa. She actively works within the world of Asian American hip hop, most recently working with Ro3lay to coordinate the Native Immigrant album launch at the I-Hotel Manilatown Center. With a wide range of experience in both academia and hip hop, she connects both worlds through her writing, publishing pieces such as “Friscopinos & the Native Immigrant” and “Re: CIRCA91.” In addition, she contributes to the telling of Asian American narratives through her “High Tides” series—a set of non-fiction short stories based on her Chinese American mother’s experiences in San Francisco. Joy Ng is an Asian American writer, community service worker, and events organizer from San Francisco, California. Born and raised in The City, she’s worked with numerous Filipino American organizations, ranging from PACE at SFSU to the Veteran’s Equit... Joy Ng is an Asian American writer, community service worker, and events organizer from San Francisco, California. Born and raised in The City, she’s worked with numerous Filipino American organizations, ranging from PACE at SFSU to the Veteran’s Equity Center in SoMa. She actively works within the world of Asian American hip hop, most recently working with Ro3lay to coordinate the Native Immigrant album launch at the I-Hotel Manilatown Center. With a wide range of experience in both academia and hip hop, she connects both worlds through her writing, publishing pieces such as “Friscopinos & the Native Immigrant” and “Re: CIRCA91.” In addition, she contributes to the telling of Asian American narratives through her “High Tides” series—a set of non-fiction short stories based on her Chinese American mother’s experiences in San Francisco. KuyaChris yes 1:48:24 19 – Richard “Ro3lay” Olivar / Rapper, Native Immigrant Album, Poetry https://kuyachris.com/19-richard-ro3lay-olivar-rapper-native-immigrant-album-poetry/ Sun, 31 Dec 2017 01:10:25 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2626 Richard "Ro3lay" Olayvar is a Filipino American rapper and artist born and raised in San Francisco. He recently dropped "Native Immigrant," a collaborative album with Mister REY that explores the duality of his experience as a Filipino American. In this episode, we dive deep into his album, talking about the motivations and meanings behind each track. He talks about the struggles of an artist in "Simula," the effect of savory but unhealthy Filipino foods in "Kawali," the intersectional experience of being a Filipino American in "Native Immigrant," the changing state of San Francisco in "Playaz," and a bunch more. Take a listen and soak up some reflections about poetry, rap, music, and hip hop. Ro3lay also shares about his family's history, specifically his mother, who also writes poetry and raised him in a very creative household. Overall, Ro3lay is a seasoned artist and performer. He has a few more upcoming projects to keep an eye out for, so listen and get connected! Richard "Ro3lay" Olayvar is a Filipino American rapper and artist born and raised in San Francisco. He recently dropped "Native Immigrant," a collaborative album with Mister REY that explores the duality of his experience as a Filipino American. Richard "Ro3lay" Olayvar is a Filipino American rapper and artist born and raised in San Francisco. He recently dropped "Native Immigrant," a collaborative album with Mister REY that explores the duality of his experience as a Filipino American. In this episode, we dive deep into his album, talking about the motivations and meanings behind each track. He talks about the struggles of an artist in "Simula," the effect of savory but unhealthy Filipino foods in "Kawali," the intersectional experience of being a Filipino American in "Native Immigrant," the changing state of San Francisco in "Playaz," and a bunch more. Take a listen and soak up some reflections about poetry, rap, music, and hip hop. Ro3lay also shares about his family's history, specifically his mother, who also writes poetry and raised him in a very creative household. Overall, Ro3lay is a seasoned artist and performer. He has a few more upcoming projects to keep an eye out for, so listen and get connected! KuyaChris yes 2:12:59 18 – Dre “Dre?Who” Cuevas / Producer, DJ, Event Organizer, Homeroom Radio, Love https://kuyachris.com/18-dre-drewho-cuevas-producer-dj-event-organizer-homeroom-radio-love/ Tue, 19 Dec 2017 02:57:21 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2599 Dre "Dre?Who" Cuevas is a Bay Area Filipino American music producer, DJ, event organizer, and all-around creative. He runs Homeroom Radio, interviewing local artists and creatives, and has also released two production EPs—LETTERS and Love Without a Limit. He's performed at numerous venues over the years and has recently begun organizing his own events and parties. In this episode, he shares a little bit about his production process as we listen to tracks from his most recent project. He also opens up about his growth as a producer and his experience of expressing emotions through his music. Dre opens up and is honest about his struggles as a student, especially in regards to moving to Southern California, away from his family and community. He found solace through music and has intentionally created his tracks to evoke certain emotions and feelings when listening. We talk a lot about personal growth, love, relationships, and creativity throughout this oped. Take a listen! Dre "Dre?Who" Cuevas is a Bay Area Filipino American music producer, DJ, event organizer, and all-around creative. He runs Homeroom Radio, interviewing local artists and creatives, and has also released two production EPs—LETTERS and Love Without a Lim... Dre "Dre?Who" Cuevas is a Bay Area Filipino American music producer, DJ, event organizer, and all-around creative. He runs Homeroom Radio, interviewing local artists and creatives, and has also released two production EPs—LETTERS and Love Without a Limit. He's performed at numerous venues over the years and has recently begun organizing his own events and parties. In this episode, he shares a little bit about his production process as we listen to tracks from his most recent project. He also opens up about his growth as a producer and his experience of expressing emotions through his music. Dre opens up and is honest about his struggles as a student, especially in regards to moving to Southern California, away from his family and community. He found solace through music and has intentionally created his tracks to evoke certain emotions and feelings when listening. We talk a lot about personal growth, love, relationships, and creativity throughout this oped. Take a listen! KuyaChris yes 2:04:24 17 – Kris “BerjaBeatz” Berja / Producer, Live Beatmaking, Hip Hop https://kuyachris.com/17-kris-berjabeatz-berja-producer-live-beatmaking-hip-hop/ Sun, 03 Dec 2017 20:16:04 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2583 Kris "BerjaBeatz" Berja is an up-and-coming producer based out of San Francisco, California. Born and raised in The City, Kris is currently pursuing the craft of music production—consistently releasing beats and collaborating with local artists. We open this episode with a beat he threw together IN 15 MINUTES—dude can work fast. We also have a few more freestyle sessions throughout our talk, with Kris walking through his process of producing beats, from finding a melody that he likes to building the percussion of the song. This one is a fun and bouncy episode! Kris "BerjaBeatz" Berja is an up-and-coming producer based out of San Francisco, California. Born and raised in The City, Kris is currently pursuing the craft of music production—consistently releasing beats and collaborating with local artists. Kris "BerjaBeatz" Berja is an up-and-coming producer based out of San Francisco, California. Born and raised in The City, Kris is currently pursuing the craft of music production—consistently releasing beats and collaborating with local artists. We open this episode with a beat he threw together IN 15 MINUTES—dude can work fast. We also have a few more freestyle sessions throughout our talk, with Kris walking through his process of producing beats, from finding a melody that he likes to building the percussion of the song. This one is a fun and bouncy episode! KuyaChris yes 2:02:04 16 – Aristel De La Cruz / Rapper, Poet, Teacher, Ethnic Studies, PEP, Activism, Wokeness https://kuyachris.com/16-aristel-de-la-cruz-rapper-poet-teacher-ethnic-studies-pep-activism-wokeness/ Sun, 19 Nov 2017 09:53:17 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2562 Aristel "Aristyles" De La Cruz is a Filipino American rapper, producer, poet, and teacher. Born and raised in San Francisco, he developed a love for hip hop through community exposure and cyphers, leading him to release multiple projects and collaborate with various local musicians, like Mister REY. As an alumnus of Balboa High School, he eventually returned there to teach an ethnic studies class through Pin@y Educational Partnerships (PEP). This experience solidified his desire to pursue a career in education. Graduating from San Francisco State University—like 80% of the other guests on this podcast—he worked in various local schools, before establishing himself at South San Francisco High School. Over the years, he's taught Ethnic Studies at this campus, eventually transitioning into his current focus of teaching English Language Development (ELD) to multiple grades. Aristel "Aristyles" De La Cruz is a Filipino American rapper, producer, poet, and teacher. Born and raised in San Francisco, he developed a love for hip hop through community exposure and cyphers, leading him to release multiple projects and collaborat... Aristel "Aristyles" De La Cruz is a Filipino American rapper, producer, poet, and teacher. Born and raised in San Francisco, he developed a love for hip hop through community exposure and cyphers, leading him to release multiple projects and collaborate with various local musicians, like Mister REY. As an alumnus of Balboa High School, he eventually returned there to teach an ethnic studies class through Pin@y Educational Partnerships (PEP). This experience solidified his desire to pursue a career in education. Graduating from San Francisco State University—like 80% of the other guests on this podcast—he worked in various local schools, before establishing himself at South San Francisco High School. Over the years, he's taught Ethnic Studies at this campus, eventually transitioning into his current focus of teaching English Language Development (ELD) to multiple grades. KuyaChris yes 2:05:46 15 – Kim Davalos / Educator, Community Artist, Rock the School Bells, CIPHER https://kuyachris.com/15-kim-davalos-educator-community-artist-rock-the-school-bells-cipher/ Thu, 09 Nov 2017 07:13:34 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2532 Kim Davalos is an accomplished Filipina American educator, community artist, and counselor. Born and raised in Stockton, California, she moved quickly through academia, finishing her undergrad at San Diego State University and her Masters in Counseling at San Francisco State University—all by the age of 21. At the same time, she worked on her craft as a poet—participating in open mics and winning a slam competition during her undergrad—eventually taking on photography as well. She's currently working as a counselor at Skyline College. She teaches for CIPHER, the first West Coast hip hop learning community in the country. Using hip hop as a platform to engage students and promote academic success, she's now taking on the position of lead Coordinator for Rock the School Bells—a conference that uses hip hop and arts to engage and empower youth to excel in higher education. Kim Davalos is an accomplished Filipina American educator, community artist, and counselor. Born and raised in Stockton, California, she moved quickly through academia, finishing her undergrad at San Diego State University and her Masters in Counseling... Kim Davalos is an accomplished Filipina American educator, community artist, and counselor. Born and raised in Stockton, California, she moved quickly through academia, finishing her undergrad at San Diego State University and her Masters in Counseling at San Francisco State University—all by the age of 21. At the same time, she worked on her craft as a poet—participating in open mics and winning a slam competition during her undergrad—eventually taking on photography as well. She's currently working as a counselor at Skyline College. She teaches for CIPHER, the first West Coast hip hop learning community in the country. Using hip hop as a platform to engage students and promote academic success, she's now taking on the position of lead Coordinator for Rock the School Bells—a conference that uses hip hop and arts to engage and empower youth to excel in higher education.

In this episode, Kim opens up with poetry and shares her journey through spoken word, arts, and academia. She shares the reasons she entered counseling as a profession and the lessons she’s learned over the years of practice. We dive into her family’s history and her growth through hip hop, eventually discussing her dreams and vision for Rock the School Bells. Throughout the episode, she also shares more poetry and reflections, ranging from feminism to her personal relationship with her grandmother. She has a lot of wisdom to share! Take a listen and let us know your thoughts!

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KuyaChris yes 2:19:35
14 – Patrick Racela / Community Organizer, Rapper, Kabataan Alliance https://kuyachris.com/14-patrick-racela-community-organizer-rapper-kabataan-alliance/ Tue, 31 Oct 2017 04:03:20 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2513 Patrick Racela is a Filipino musician and community organizer based out of San Francisco. Originally from Pittsburgh, California, Pat shares his transition from student to organizer throughout his years at San Francisco State University. He became politicized though the League of Filipino Students (LFS) at SFSU and was also a member of the historic Pilipino American Collegiate Endeavor (PACE). Currently, he works as a coordinator for Kabataan at the Filipino Community Center—a high school youth program—while also organizing for Kabataan Alliance, a national coalition of various youth and student organizations across the United States. In this episode, Pat shares a few raps and poems inspired by his life experiences and political education. We also talk about his various community exposure trips throughout the Philippines with Kapit Bisig Kabataan Network and his continuing advocacy work for Filipino issues and concerns. Patrick Racela is a Filipino musician and community organizer based out of San Francisco. Originally from Pittsburgh, California, Pat shares his transition from student to organizer throughout his years at San Francisco State University. Patrick Racela is a Filipino musician and community organizer based out of San Francisco. Originally from Pittsburgh, California, Pat shares his transition from student to organizer throughout his years at San Francisco State University. He became politicized though the League of Filipino Students (LFS) at SFSU and was also a member of the historic Pilipino American Collegiate Endeavor (PACE). Currently, he works as a coordinator for Kabataan at the Filipino Community Center—a high school youth program—while also organizing for Kabataan Alliance, a national coalition of various youth and student organizations across the United States. In this episode, Pat shares a few raps and poems inspired by his life experiences and political education. We also talk about his various community exposure trips throughout the Philippines with Kapit Bisig Kabataan Network and his continuing advocacy work for Filipino issues and concerns. KuyaChris yes 2:15:30 13 – Rey Timosa Novicio Jr. / Mister REY, Producer, Mental Health, Community https://kuyachris.com/13-rey-timosa-novicio-jr-mister-rey-producer-mental-health-community/ Fri, 06 Oct 2017 20:58:58 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2428 Rey Timosa Novicio Jr. is a Pinoy musician, producer, community mentor, and mental health advocate. He goes by the stage name of Mister REY and has released both instrumental and solo albums. He also recently produced the whole Native Immigrant album of Ro3lay. Born and raised in Makati, Philippines, he immigrated to the US when he was 12 and moved into the Mission District of San Francisco. He participated in multiple youth programs such as Youth Speaks and has now transitioned into the role of facilitator. He has coordinated afterschool programs in the South of Market (SOMA) neighborhood—some specifically targeting at-risk 1st generation Filipino American you who were on probation. He has used music to support and youth and provide spaces for expression and growth. Currently, he’s the Program Coordinator for Filipino Mental Health Initiative, an organization based out of the Bayanihan Resource Center, which aims to provide community services and end the stigma surrounding mental health issues. Rey Timosa Novicio Jr. is a Pinoy musician, producer, community mentor, and mental health advocate. He goes by the stage name of Mister REY and has released both instrumental and solo albums. He also recently produced the whole Native Immigrant album o... Rey Timosa Novicio Jr. is a Pinoy musician, producer, community mentor, and mental health advocate. He goes by the stage name of Mister REY and has released both instrumental and solo albums. He also recently produced the whole Native Immigrant album of Ro3lay. Born and raised in Makati, Philippines, he immigrated to the US when he was 12 and moved into the Mission District of San Francisco. He participated in multiple youth programs such as Youth Speaks and has now transitioned into the role of facilitator. He has coordinated afterschool programs in the South of Market (SOMA) neighborhood—some specifically targeting at-risk 1st generation Filipino American you who were on probation. He has used music to support and youth and provide spaces for expression and growth. Currently, he’s the Program Coordinator for Filipino Mental Health Initiative, an organization based out of the Bayanihan Resource Center, which aims to provide community services and end the stigma surrounding mental health issues. KuyaChris yes 3:11:59 12 – Kevyn Lorenzana / First Time in Philippines, Education, Martial Law https://kuyachris.com/12-kevyn-lorenzana-first-time-in-philippines-education-martial-law/ Sun, 17 Sep 2017 00:38:28 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2422 Kevyn Lorenza just came back from his first trip in the Philipines! He was able to visit different communities in Luzon and Mindanao, with the specific goal of learning about the education system and the struggles of the various sectors in the country. He went with Laya Migrant Youth for Change and Action, based out of Daly City, and this episode has a few reflections on the trip, specifically about the struggles of the Aeta and Lumad communities. Our local hosts in the Philippines were PSET and Salupongan International. We talk about the shifting educational system with K-12, the problems in indigenous communities, and the exposure to martial law in Mindanao. Kevyn Lorenza just came back from his first trip in the Philipines! He was able to visit different communities in Luzon and Mindanao, with the specific goal of learning about the education system and the struggles of the various sectors in the country.... Kevyn Lorenza just came back from his first trip in the Philipines! He was able to visit different communities in Luzon and Mindanao, with the specific goal of learning about the education system and the struggles of the various sectors in the country. He went with Laya Migrant Youth for Change and Action, based out of Daly City, and this episode has a few reflections on the trip, specifically about the struggles of the Aeta and Lumad communities. Our local hosts in the Philippines were PSET and Salupongan International. We talk about the shifting educational system with K-12, the problems in indigenous communities, and the exposure to martial law in Mindanao. KuyaChris yes 1:50:45 11 – Rodney “Mr. No Name” Manalo / Musician, Freestyle King, Daly City, Hip Hop https://kuyachris.com/11-rodney-mr-no-name-manalo-musician-freestyle-king-daly-city-hip-hop/ Tue, 04 Jul 2017 01:33:42 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2412 Rodney Manalo is a Filipino American musician who goes by the stage name of Mr. No Name. He was born in Daly City and continues to create and perform his music in local shows and events—this guy can rip a freestyle! He's also in the Year Up program, currently interning at a tech company, while still consistently working on his craft. He has long-term visions to work as an illustrator and character designer, while still maintaining his love for music. He shares his experience growing up in the Bay Area, his personal struggles with drugs and family, while also diving into the positive influence music has played in his life. There’s good reflections and advice on music in this episode—tangible skills to work on such as rhyming and cadence—in addition to personal reflections on depression and self-harm ideations. This one is worth listening to, especially for the amount of freestyles Rod dropped during the episode. Rodney Manalo is a Filipino American musician who goes by the stage name of Mr. No Name. He was born in Daly City and continues to create and perform his music in local shows and events—this guy can rip a freestyle! He's also in the Year Up program, Rodney Manalo is a Filipino American musician who goes by the stage name of Mr. No Name. He was born in Daly City and continues to create and perform his music in local shows and events—this guy can rip a freestyle! He's also in the Year Up program, currently interning at a tech company, while still consistently working on his craft. He has long-term visions to work as an illustrator and character designer, while still maintaining his love for music. He shares his experience growing up in the Bay Area, his personal struggles with drugs and family, while also diving into the positive influence music has played in his life. There’s good reflections and advice on music in this episode—tangible skills to work on such as rhyming and cadence—in addition to personal reflections on depression and self-harm ideations. This one is worth listening to, especially for the amount of freestyles Rod dropped during the episode. KuyaChris yes 2:07:43 10 – Kevyn Lorenzana / Emcee, Poet, Barber, Ethnic Studies, UCLA https://kuyachris.com/10-kevyn-lorenzana-emcee-poet-barber-ethnic-studies-ucla/ Thu, 22 Jun 2017 21:15:20 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2398 Kevyn Lorenzana is a 22-year-old Filipino American emcee, poet, musician, organizer, barber, and community organizer. He’s headed to the Philippines this summer on a community exposure trip to visit rural schools. Once he comes back in the fall, he will be pursuing a degree in Asian American Studies at UCLA. In this return episode, he shares an original song written for Roderick Daus-Magbual’s Filipina/o American Community Issues class and drops a few freestyle bars. We talk about his history of being an SF-born FilAm and his journey through realizing his identity—thanks to the help of Skyline College and ethnic studies. Kevyn is dedicated to serving his community and shares his long-term vision to be a teacher, especially for incarcerated youth. He shares experiences of being mugged at gunpoint as an 8th grader and the effects of the prison system within his own family, but also shares an understanding perspective in regards to larger systems of influence such as poverty and colonial mentality. Take a listen, be inspired, and join us on this journey. Kevyn Lorenzana is a 22-year-old Filipino American emcee, poet, musician, organizer, barber, and community organizer. He’s headed to the Philippines this summer on a community exposure trip to visit rural schools. Once he comes back in the fall, Kevyn Lorenzana is a 22-year-old Filipino American emcee, poet, musician, organizer, barber, and community organizer. He’s headed to the Philippines this summer on a community exposure trip to visit rural schools. Once he comes back in the fall, he will be pursuing a degree in Asian American Studies at UCLA. In this return episode, he shares an original song written for Roderick Daus-Magbual’s Filipina/o American Community Issues class and drops a few freestyle bars. We talk about his history of being an SF-born FilAm and his journey through realizing his identity—thanks to the help of Skyline College and ethnic studies. Kevyn is dedicated to serving his community and shares his long-term vision to be a teacher, especially for incarcerated youth. He shares experiences of being mugged at gunpoint as an 8th grader and the effects of the prison system within his own family, but also shares an understanding perspective in regards to larger systems of influence such as poverty and colonial mentality. Take a listen, be inspired, and join us on this journey. KuyaChris yes 1:38:19 09 – Katrina Liwanag / Singer, SF Native, Filipina, Community Organizer, SFSU, Expo Trip https://kuyachris.com/09-katrina-liwanag-singer-sf-native-filipina-community-organizer-sfsu-expo-trip/ Sat, 10 Jun 2017 22:59:45 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2382 Katrina Liwanag is a FilAm singer-songwriter native to San Francisco and is active in multiple community organizations and grassroots movements. In this episode, she sings and performs two songs that relate to her experiences regarding community exposure trips throughout the Philippines. She shares her point of view on political and social issues, her background growing up in San Francisco, her involvement in various Filipina/o American organizations such as Kappa Psi Epsilon and League of Filipino Students, and her upcoming trip to the Philippines. Katrina Liwanag is a FilAm singer-songwriter native to San Francisco and is active in multiple community organizations and grassroots movements. In this episode, she sings and performs two songs that relate to her experiences regarding community exposu... Katrina Liwanag is a FilAm singer-songwriter native to San Francisco and is active in multiple community organizations and grassroots movements. In this episode, she sings and performs two songs that relate to her experiences regarding community exposure trips throughout the Philippines. She shares her point of view on political and social issues, her background growing up in San Francisco, her involvement in various Filipina/o American organizations such as Kappa Psi Epsilon and League of Filipino Students, and her upcoming trip to the Philippines. KuyaChris yes 1:55:54 08 – Michelle Yvette / Pinay Dancer, Showbiz, Religion, Relationships https://kuyachris.com/08-michelle-yvette-pinay-dancer-showbiz-religion-relationships/ Thu, 01 Jun 2017 20:47:39 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2358 Michelle Yvette is a Pinay who immigrated to the United States in 2012 and is currently at Skyline College, pursuing a degree in Business. During her time in Daly City, she found a sense of home and community through dancing and other artistic endeavors. She’s helped choreograph for the Pilipino Cultural Night and has been working alongside other local dancers for events run by The Filipino Channel (TFC). In this episode, she opens up with a short song cover and poem, then shares her aspirations to pursue a career in Showbiz, especially in the Philippines. She also dives into how religion has given her support and purpose, especially in the face of challenges such as a broken family and immigrating to a new country. In the end, she leaves a few reflections for younger Filipinas, both general thoughts and relationship advice. Come listen! Michelle Yvette is a Pinay who immigrated to the United States in 2012 and is currently at Skyline College, pursuing a degree in Business. During her time in Daly City, she found a sense of home and community through dancing and other artistic endeavor... Michelle Yvette is a Pinay who immigrated to the United States in 2012 and is currently at Skyline College, pursuing a degree in Business. During her time in Daly City, she found a sense of home and community through dancing and other artistic endeavors. She’s helped choreograph for the Pilipino Cultural Night and has been working alongside other local dancers for events run by The Filipino Channel (TFC). In this episode, she opens up with a short song cover and poem, then shares her aspirations to pursue a career in Showbiz, especially in the Philippines. She also dives into how religion has given her support and purpose, especially in the face of challenges such as a broken family and immigrating to a new country. In the end, she leaves a few reflections for younger Filipinas, both general thoughts and relationship advice. Come listen! KuyaChris yes 1:39:56 07 – Dessa Hipolito / Filipina Immigrant, American Culture, Skyline College, Pilipino Cultural Night https://kuyachris.com/07-dessa-hipolito-filipina-immigrant-american-culture-skyline-college-pilipino-cultural-night/ Wed, 24 May 2017 01:31:42 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2332 Dessa Hipolito is a Filipina immigrant to California, an active leader at Skyline College, a singer, and an overall great role model for FilAm youth. On campus, she’s been this year’s Commissioner for Student Activities while also producing the last two Pilipino Cultural Nights. Next school year, she is planning to transfer to UCSD and continue her academic and personal journey. She shares her family's immigration history, her struggles, and her integration process into America and community college life. She closes with some reflections on relationships and shares some advice for other young immigrants. Dessa Hipolito is a Filipina immigrant to California, an active leader at Skyline College, a singer, and an overall great role model for FilAm youth. On campus, she’s been this year’s Commissioner for Student Activities while also producing the last tw... Dessa Hipolito is a Filipina immigrant to California, an active leader at Skyline College, a singer, and an overall great role model for FilAm youth. On campus, she’s been this year’s Commissioner for Student Activities while also producing the last two Pilipino Cultural Nights. Next school year, she is planning to transfer to UCSD and continue her academic and personal journey. She shares her family's immigration history, her struggles, and her integration process into America and community college life. She closes with some reflections on relationships and shares some advice for other young immigrants. KuyaChris yes 1:17:59 06 – Bea Zamora / Philippine Teacher, Skyline College, America https://kuyachris.com/06-bea-zamora-philippine-teacher-skyline-college-america/ Sun, 07 May 2017 17:23:58 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2307 Ate Bea Zamora is this year's Foreign Language Teaching Assistant (FLTA) at Skyline College. She's an English teacher in the Philippines and has been in the US for the last 9 months, teaching the Filipino language and assisting Filipino American classes through the Fulbright teaching program. She's also been co-assisting College Success classes at both Westmoor and South City high schools. She shares a reflective poem, talks about her experience of arriving in America, and expounds on the differences she's noticed between Philippine-born and American-born Filipinos. Pinay power! Ate Bea Zamora is this year's Foreign Language Teaching Assistant (FLTA) at Skyline College. She's an English teacher in the Philippines and has been in the US for the last 9 months, teaching the Filipino language and assisting Filipino American classe... Ate Bea Zamora is this year's Foreign Language Teaching Assistant (FLTA) at Skyline College. She's an English teacher in the Philippines and has been in the US for the last 9 months, teaching the Filipino language and assisting Filipino American classes through the Fulbright teaching program. She's also been co-assisting College Success classes at both Westmoor and South City high schools. She shares a reflective poem, talks about her experience of arriving in America, and expounds on the differences she's noticed between Philippine-born and American-born Filipinos. Pinay power! KuyaChris yes 1:43:30 05 – Sean Pierre / Photography, Cannabis Entrepreneurship, Daly City, Relationships https://kuyachris.com/05-sean-pierre-photography-cannabis-entrepreneurship-daly-city-relationships/ Mon, 01 May 2017 23:22:40 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2296 Sean Pierre Viray is a Filipino American entrepreneur and creative. He worked as a professional photographer before launching a medical cannabis delivery service—Mighty Breed. We talk about his experiences growing up in San Francisco and the various transitions he's gone through in life—he even shares a classic Filipino love story at Serramonte Mall and gives some relationships advice, so listen up young ones! Follow him on Instagram @sean_pierre_ and check out MightyBreed.org Sean Pierre Viray is a Filipino American entrepreneur and creative. He worked as a professional photographer before launching a medical cannabis delivery service—Mighty Breed. We talk about his experiences growing up in San Francisco and the various tr... @sean_pierre_ and check out MightyBreed.org

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.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-200{width:100% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 20px;}.fusion-builder-column-200 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !important;margin-right : 0px;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 0px !important;margin-left : 0px;}@media only screen and (max-width:927px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-200{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-200 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 0px;margin-left : 0px;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-200{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-200 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 0px;margin-left : 0px;}}.fusion-body .fusion-flex-container.fusion-builder-row-110{ padding-top : 20px;margin-top : 0px;padding-right : 10%;padding-bottom : 20px;margin-bottom : 0px;padding-left : 10%;}.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-201{width:100% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 20px;}.fusion-builder-column-201 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !important;margin-right : 0px;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 0px !important;margin-left : 0px;}@media only screen and (max-width:927px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-201{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-201 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 0px;margin-left : 0px;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-201{width:100% !important;}.]]>
KuyaChris yes 2:06:12
04 – Herschel / Bakersfield, Filipino Education, PEP https://kuyachris.com/04-herschel-bakersfield-filipino-education-pep/ Mon, 24 Apr 2017 03:26:54 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2269 Herschel is a Filipino American who was born in Mountain Veiw, but grew up in Bakersfield, CA. While a student at SFSU, he's taught at Denman Middle School with Pin@y (Pinay/Pinoy) Educational Partnerships (PEP) and is looking to be a copywriter in the future. We talk about how he distanced himself from Filipinos while growing up in a predominantly white neighborhood, but then found a sense of inportance in his culture after taking an Ethnic Studies class at De Anza College—an awesome community college institution in Cupertino. Herschel is a Filipino American who was born in Mountain Veiw, but grew up in Bakersfield, CA. Herschel is a Filipino American who was born in Mountain Veiw, but grew up in Bakersfield, CA. While a student at SFSU, he's taught at Denman Middle School with Pin@y (Pinay/Pinoy) Educational Partnerships (PEP) and is looking to be a copywriter in the future. We talk about how he distanced himself from Filipinos while growing up in a predominantly white neighborhood, but then found a sense of inportance in his culture after taking an Ethnic Studies class at De Anza College—an awesome community college institution in Cupertino. KuyaChris yes 1:19:30 03 – Joseph Magsaysay / Immigration, Architecture, Infant Seeds, Community https://kuyachris.com/03-joseph-magsaysay-immigration-architecture-infant-seeds-community/ Thu, 20 Apr 2017 19:11:11 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2257 Joseph Magsaysay is a designer, poet, MC, and community organizer. He was born in the Philippines, moved to San Francisco and Daly City, attended Skyline College and UC Berkeley, and is now working at SFO. Listen as he drops some bars and shares a little bit of his life story and points of view on design and community. His current projects include Infant Seeds, an art collective, and Rays Up, an after-school high school program for creative arts. Follow him on Instagram @infin8seph and @infantseeds Joseph Magsaysay is a designer, poet, MC, and community organizer. He was born in the Philippines, moved to San Francisco and Daly City, attended Skyline College and UC Berkeley, and is now working at SFO. Listen as he drops some bars and shares a litt... Joseph Magsaysay is a designer, poet, MC, and community organizer. He was born in the Philippines, moved to San Francisco and Daly City, attended Skyline College and UC Berkeley, and is now working at SFO. Listen as he drops some bars and shares a little bit of his life story and points of view on design and community.<br /> <br /> His current projects include Infant Seeds, an art collective, and Rays Up, an after-school high school program for creative arts.<br /> <br /> Follow him on Instagram @infin8seph and @infantseeds KuyaChris yes 2:20:40 02 – Joshua Berja / Year Up, Dating, College Success https://kuyachris.com/02-joshua-berja-year-up-dating-college-success/ Mon, 27 Mar 2017 14:06:20 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2221 Joshua Berja is a Filipino American, native to San Francisco! I met him when he was in high school and part of Kabataan, an after-school group based out of the Filipino Community Center in San Francisco. He's currently part of the Year Up program, which trains and places urban youth into tech positions. In this episode, Joshua shares a rap verse, talks about his post-highschool experience, and breaks down Tinder within today's "hook up" culture. Joshua Berja is a Filipino American, native to San Francisco! I met him when he was in high school and part of Kabataan, an after-school group based out of the Filipino Community Center in San Francisco. He's currently part of the Year Up program, Joshua Berja is a Filipino American, native to San Francisco! I met him when he was in high school and part of Kabataan, an after-school group based out of the Filipino Community Center in San Francisco. He's currently part of the Year Up program, which trains and places urban youth into tech positions. In this episode, Joshua shares a rap verse, talks about his post-highschool experience, and breaks down Tinder within today's "hook up" culture. KuyaChris yes 1:44:01 01 – Relaunch / Kevyn Lorenzana / Student, Barber, MC https://kuyachris.com/01-relaunch-kevyn-lorenzana-student-barber-mc/ Sun, 12 Mar 2017 05:49:56 +0000 http://kuyachris.com/?p=2185 Kevyn Lorenzana is a student, barber, and artist based out of Daly City, CA. A Filipino American, he was born and raised in San Francisco. He attends Skyline College, participating in multiple programs such as Filipino Student Union, Kababayan Learning Community, Kapatiran Mentorship Program, and is also a consistent performer. He cuts hair in the Top of the Hill area of Daly City—hit him up. Kevyn Lorenzana is a student, barber, and artist based out of Daly City, CA. A Filipino American, he was born and raised in San Francisco. He attends Skyline College, participating in multiple programs such as Filipino Student Union, Kevyn Lorenzana is a student, barber, and artist based out of Daly City, CA. A Filipino American, he was born and raised in San Francisco. He attends Skyline College, participating in multiple programs such as Filipino Student Union, Kababayan Learning Community, Kapatiran Mentorship Program, and is also a consistent performer. He cuts hair in the Top of the Hill area of Daly City—hit him up. KuyaChris yes 2:31:04 The Miseducation of the Filipino https://kuyachris.com/the-miseducation-of-the-filipino/ Wed, 15 Apr 2015 23:03:01 +0000 http://goodvibesnation.com/?p=1148 Education is a vital weapon of a people striving for economic emancipation, political independence and cultural renaissance. We are such a people. Philippine education therefore must produce Filipinos who are aware of their country's problems, who understand the basic solution to these problems, and who care enough to have courage to work and sacrifice for their country's salvation. Education is a vital weapon of a people striving for economic emancipation, political independence and cultural renaissance. We are such a people. Philippine education therefore must produce Filipinos who are aware of their country's problems,


By Renato Constantino

 

Education is a vital weapon of a people striving for economic emancipation, political independence and cultural renaissance. We are such a people. Philippine education therefore must produce Filipinos who are aware of their country's problems, who understand the basic solution to these problems, and who care enough to have courage to work and sacrifice for their country's salvation.



Nationalism in Education
In recent years, in various sectors of our society, there have been nationalist stirrings which were crystallized and articulated by the late Claro M. Recto. There were jealous demands for the recognition of Philippine sovereignty on the Bases question. There were appeals for the correction of the iniquitous economic relations between the Philippines and the United States. For a time, Filipino businessmen and industrialists rallied around the banner of the FILIPINO FIRST policy, and various scholars and economists proposed economic emancipation as an intermediate goal for the nation. In the field of art, there have been signs of a new appreciation for our own culture. Indeed, there has been much nationalist activity in many areas of endeavor, but we have yet to hear of a well-organized campaign on the part of our educational leaders for nationalism in education.Although most of our educators are engaged in the lively debate on techniques and tools for the improved instructions, not one major educational leader has come out for a truly nationalist education. Of course some pedagogical experts have written on some aspects of nationalism in education. However, no comprehensive educational programme has been advanced as a corollary to the programmes for political and economic emancipation. This is a tragic situation because the nationalist movement is crippled at the outset by a citizenry that is ignorant of our basic ills and is apathetic to our national welfare.

New Perspective

Some of our economic and political leaders have gained a new perception of our relations with the United States as a result of their second look at Philippine-American relations since the turn of the century. The reaction which has emerged as economic and political nationalism is an attempt on their part to revise the iniquities of the past and to complete the movement started by our revolutionary leaders of 1896. The majority of our educational leaders, however, still continue to trace their direct lineal descent to the first soldier-teachers of the American invasion army. They seem oblivious to the fact that the educational system and philosophy of which they are proud inheritors were valid only within the framework of American colonialism. The educational system introduced by the Americans had to correspond and was designed to correspond to the economic and political reality of American conquest.








Capturing Minds

The most effective means of subjugating a people is to capture their minds. Military victory does not necessarily signify conquest. As long as feelings of resistance remain in the hearts of the vanquished, no conqueror is secure. This is best illustrated by the occupation of the Philippines by the Japanese militarists during the Second World War.

Despite the terroristic regime imposed by the Japanese warlords, the Filipinos were never conquered. Hatred for the Japanese was engendered by their oppressive techniques which in turn were intensified by the stubborn resistance of the Filipino people. Japanese propagandists and psychological warfare experts, however, saw the necessity of winning the minds of the people. Had the Japanese stayed longer, Filipino children who were being schooled under the auspices of the new dispensation would have grown into strong pillars of the Greater Ea...]]>
KuyaChris yes 59:08